FAA can regulate Drones
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Thread: FAA can regulate Drones

  1. #1

    FAA can regulate Drones

    The National Transportation Safety Board has decided that the FAA should be able to regulate drones.

    There is an interesting story on it here.

    http://money.cnn.com/2014/11/19/tech...nes/index.html

    Apparently what prompted this was a fine given out by the FAA to a man who used a remote controlled glider to film an advertisement. He was fined $10,000. That was overturned by an NTSB Judge in March.

    There is no mention in the article if the man's fine will be imposed again.

  2. #2
    Amazing how They tell Others how to do stuff
    Thursday, November 27 2014 I Lost My Best Friend My Uncle! He Was Amazing person He was a volunteer For Las Vegas metro Police he will be missed, I Volunteer with him Many Times With LVMPD And USFS


    THOMAS CURTIS
    Thursday Nov 27th 2014

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Cirrus N210MS View Post
    Amazing how They tell Others how to do stuff

    That would be the case with ALL government agencies. It is becoming increasingly scary.

  4. #4
    We've always had rules/regs when operating R/C aircraft. There is a reasonable need to regulate the operation of these drones on a number of levels/issues to ensure Aviation & Public Safety. The question is How Far we go in regulating them. There again, there are "reasonable" avenues to regulate certain types of drones and the manner in which they are operated BUT there is also more than ample latitude to exempt certain types of drones & operations. Hopefully, common sense will prevail.

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  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by StormILM View Post
    We've always had rules/regs when operating R/C aircraft. There is a reasonable need to regulate the operation of these drones on a number of levels/issues to ensure Aviation & Public Safety. The question is How Far we go in regulating them. There again, there are "reasonable" avenues to regulate certain types of drones and the manner in which they are operated BUT there is also more than ample latitude to exempt certain types of drones & operations. Hopefully, common sense will prevail.

    Agree with you!

  6. #6
    Another scary item (especially to modeler types) is that if you happen to posses an FAA pilots license then you can be liable for additional legal sanctions and fines. (It's a " You should know better" gothch.)

    The requirement (obligation) to notify airport authorities (?) if operating withing five miles of their airport is also somewhat undetailed. Who is in change? Can they refuse/ prevent you from flying? Does it apply to "any" model types other than R/C? Control Line? Free flight? What documents do you need to prove that you had did notify? Or got permission?

    Nothing is really spelled out yet. only the possibility of legal action.

    Norm

  7. #7
    Common- what did you say? But really, I feel these devices absolutely need some kind of external regulation, that is to say not relying on Amazon, Jerry's Sheetrock company or amateur photographer Joe next door to behave themselves. They might all mean well but there are so many variables and considerations not yet realized that I just don't think the dialogue can wait.
    W7-64, 3GHz, 16GB Ram, GEForce 9400GT

  8. #8
    Commercial Operation certainly needs regulation to ensure proper operating parameters and safety. Private recreational use to probably a far lesser extent depending on weight & performance capability of said craft but bear in mind we are already seeing too many instances of people recklessly or even intentionally interfering with manned aircraft, invasion of privacy issues and also deliberate criminal use of such vehicles. One thing of note, regardless of whether you're a licensed pilot or not, if you operate a remotely controlled aircraft or balloon (radio controlled or autonomously) and bust existing FAA regs, cause damage or death, you're subject to fines and/or imprisonment as well as possible lawsuit. Operating a vehicle, firearm, aircraft, etc, you're responsible for the safe operation of it and in many instances, the ability to competently operate such machines/tools may need to be documented/proven or at the very least, the operator is required to know the legal parameters of his machine/tool.
    Last edited by StormILM; November 21st, 2014 at 17:15.

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