Flying Supersonic. Tu-144 'Charger' v3.5
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Thread: Flying Supersonic. Tu-144 'Charger' v3.5

  1. #1

    Flying Supersonic. Tu-144 'Charger' v3.5

    Hi All!

    I'm trying to fly the Charger downloaded from here, but I cannot resolve the problem of wobbling and tipping over on initial load.

    I change the fuel load under 75% but the woblling is still present.

    Any help?

  2. #2
    Ce_zeta,

    I'm short on time due to some impending travel, but if you can give me a day or so to come back to this thread with a likely extremely lengthy response, I can help.
    I fly this aircraft almost daily these days and it's become my preferred complex Russian airliner of choice over the PT Tu-154!

    With that being said, the learning curve is just as steep, if not more so, than the 154, and there is quite a lot of initial setup to do to get this to fly properly (unless you start hacking the addon and removing significant functionality).

    Among the things you need to do, which I'll go into much, much more detail later:

    Download a few gauge update files from the Avsimrus/Avsim.su forums that fix aerodynamics error when crossing Mach 1.
    Properly adjust your weight and balance both in regard to fuel and in regard to payload.
    Mandatory use of the rather user unfriendly joystick setup utility. You must program your hardware through this utility after "disabling" it in FSX proper.

    I'll provide you with links to all files and further guidance when I have more time.


    Very few people both in the English-speaking and in the Russian speaking community seem to be able to fly this increadibly complex and beautiful looking piece of freeware, but I've figured it out and do so routinely, so I'll get back you in about a day with extensive detail on what you have to do. I promise.

    Here are some screenshots I posted on another forum of me flying the Tu-144D (at various locations) in the meantime:











    Again...I'll get back to you with further info soon! This is a complex yet extremely rewarding addon, and it's possible to learn without needing to "hack" any gauges or remove any functionality as presented!

  3. #3
    Thank you very much, Sean!

    I installed the v3.5 from the link posted and about the update, I downloaded the file posted in the post #2700 from this page of the avsim.ru/avsimrus forum.

    I hope that in the future days I can start to learn to fly this beauty (without hacking of course)...But first of all... I need help to cope with the wobbling and tipping problem.
    Thanks again.


    Fly supersonic is the real challenge

  4. #4
    I will definitely be watching this. I've had a passing curiosity in the Concordeski and I'll take advantage of ce_zeta's predicament and glean as much knowledge as I can!

  5. #5
    Do my eyes deceive me...are those 3D gauges in the VC, and is that self shadowing beneath the canard...? Is this now a native bird, Sean?

  6. #6
    Ok, get ready for a long post...

    This is for the Tupolev Tu-144D (NATO: "CHARGER") for FSX, created by Nikita Konstantinov, Mikhail Mitin, and others.
    This addon is freeware, and is FSX-Native in its entirety. This latest version is 3.5 and is meant only for FSX. There are older versions "2.0/2.5 series" for FS2004.

    Here's an extremely brief, partial-history of this aircraft which I posted on another forum where people were asking about it:

    The aircraft itself represents what was to be the final edition of the Tu-144 prior to the fall of the USSR. Unlike earlier versions, and unlike the later flying laboratory version (I'll get to that in a minute), the D model was fitted with non-afterburning turbojet engines designed to boost the range of the Tu-144 so that it would be comparable to the Concorde. As far as I know there were six D models produced, plus one left incomplete (need to confirm this in my book). The Tu-144 concept itself proved to pretty much be a failure for the USSR, as a host of problems plagued the type throughout it's service life and evolutions. These problems were primarily mechanical in nature, and the the frequency of issues was high enough that Alexei Tupolev and two government aviation safety representatives had to personally inspect each aircraft and sign off on each flight leaving Moscow. For what it's worth, the Tu-144 could allegedly fly higher and faster than the Concorde due to how it was constructed (more titanium) but the amount of systems issues, as well as fatigue issues the aircraft had really negated any advantages. As far as I can tell, the only passenger route that it served was from Moscow (Domodedovo) to Almaty, Kazakhstan (known as Alma-Ata in Soviet times), though it did make appearances at other airports during flight testing, and for mail-runs.

    The last iteration of the Tu-144 to fly was called the Tu-144LL, and was a joint project between NASA, Lockheed, a few other American companies, and Tupolev to support a "flying laboratory". This was a re-engined (with afterburners again!) converted Tu-144D that flew off and on until the mid-90s. There are videos on Youtube of this aircraft taking off and landing that you can find today.



    Getting started with the addon:
    You can download the model here...
    http://www.avsim.su/f/fsx-originalni...3-5-44272.html

    Additionally, some XML guage logic updates are needed, as without them, you will always experience unrecoverable Mach tuck when approach Mach 1. They are available at the links below:

    First download the "Hidro_Logik.zip" link to at the bottom of the first post here:
    http://www.avsim.su/forum/topic/9009...1%D0%B8%D0%B8/

    Then, download the "3.5" file linked to at the top of this page:
    http://www.avsim.su/forum/topic/3146...D0%B5/page-137

    I think that covers it for gauge updates, but I cannot recall precisely right now if I also downloaded that "saved Ivars" file in the first link as well.



    Next, download this limited English documentation which was created by someone on the Project Tupolev forums. I have re-uploaded it to the link below (as the PT forums are being blocked by my web browser as an "attack" site right now.)
    http://www.filedropper.com/tu-144documents

    The documents contain an illustrated checklist/panel guide, as well as a narrative on how to use the addon's "joystick setup utility". Like the PT Tu-154, this Tu-144 requires that the user set's up their hardware to interface with the addon directly, rather than via FSX. This means that your controls should be "disabled" in FSX itself prior to using this addon. Please read through the joystick setup utility documetnation multiple times, as it will likely take multiple attempts to get everything configured. Unfortunately, the utility is only available in Russian, which makes things difficult. It is not transferable with the Tu-154's utility, which is easier to use. Please let me know if you need further assistance.
    I use Saitek products, and with this addon, I employed the use of my X-52 joystick, and Saitek Rudder Pedals.

    I mapped the following functions to my controls. Rudder, Toe Brakes (left/right), View Panning (hat switch), Autopilot Disconnect, Elevator, Ailerons, Throttle, Elevator Trim (make sure you map elevator trim!), and nose droop controls.






    This addon requires that you start it up in "2D cockpit" mode. There is a setting you can adjust in the FSX menus to facilitate that. Then, when the aircraft loads, you can right click in an open spot on the 2D panel (one that's not part of the panel bitmap) and navigate to the VC cockpit view.

    Additionally, when you select the aircraft, do so from the FSX menu, so you can configure fuel and payload prior to loading it into a flight session. This is required so that you don't get the wobbly/out of control issue. The addon comes with four versions. Wide panel with VC, 4:3 panel with VC, wide without VC, and 4:3 without VC. I always use wide with VC.

    For your fuel, load it to no more than 75%.
    For payload, I usually keep all values default WITH THE EXCEPTION OF payload stations 3 through 6. The stations are simply designated 3, 4, 5, and 6, and they should have zero (0) payload in them. There are additional stations designated in Russian. Leave those alone.


    Now...you should be ready to load the addon into your actual flight session.

    When you do so, you'll first be presented with the 2D view looking at the captains panel. The nose will be in supersonic mode, and the canards retracted.
    When you try to switch views here, you WILL lose control of your view panning functionality. This is where the joystick setup utility comes in. You can bring it up using one of the Shift+# combinations. In the documents, you'll see how to select in the utility that you want to map views to your hatswitch. Documentation labels it as "headmovement". The documentation lists the functions in numerical order for the axis section as well as the buttons section, and since I don't know Russian, I count the entries I select until I get to the one I want. For example, the documentation lists head movement as the tenth entry, so I click through the Russian labels until I get to the tenth one.

    So, program you're head movement first. Following this, program the rest of the controls that you wish to apply. Read further above to see what functions I have applied at a minimum.
    Please note, you should be able to see immediate feedback with your toe brakes, throttle, elevator, and aileron controls. You will NOT see rudder pedal movement (outside of toe brake depressions) without hydraulic power to the aircraft.
    As far as I can tell, the throttle can only be mapped to one axis (so any CH or Saitek throttle quads will only read one lever).
    The utility seems to support multiple joysticks, but I know that you can have issues if you program functions across more than two. Again, I have only programmed by X-52 and Saitek rudder pedals, and everything works fine here.

    The rudder pedal mapping is obviousl, but for the other controls on the X-52, I programmed the autopilot disconnect to the blue botton on the throttle next to the slider switch (kind of in the middle). For trim, I programmed the up/down movement on the upper hat switch (to the left of the "missile launch" button that has the protective guard you flip up).
    For the canard movements, I programmed up/down onto buttons T1 and T2 at the base of the X-52 joystick (not the throttle).


    So....work through setting up your aircraft with the guidance above. Please note that some axis controls through the utility may need to be reversed (for non-obvious reasons) while some can be left the same. The document "manualtest.pdf" in the zip file linked above should lead you through everything.


    So, by this time, you should have a cold/dark aircraft sitting on the ramp, stabalized, with your view controls working.
    Next up, there is a shift key (I think shift 6) which should enable a pop-up window with a bunch of green buttons. The green button to the lower right (just above the far end of the black box with numbers) is an electrical/navigation alignment "quickstart" that should get you batteries on and your nav instruments partially aligned.

    Now, study those manuals, learn the 2D clickspots, and figure out the systems. I will follow this post up later on how to properly align your compasses (mainly the HSI) based on your lat/long and just using a couple of simple guages in the plane. Please note that I really have no idea at this point how to actually use that massive INS panel, but everything else is clear to me!

    Also note that the aircraft is assisted in landing by a parachute system. It's not marked in the documents or explained how to enable it. It's on your Overhead Center panel, and is the set of two buttons, with a cover for one at a time, near the upper/middle/right, with a yellow light near it (two vertical buttons, located to the right of your overhead canard controls labelled "8" in the document). Ensure that the upper of the two bottons is not shielded. Then, when you tough down, press your spoiler key on your keyboard to activate the parachute. When you press it again, the parachutes are released, and cannot be re-activated until you reload the plane. I finally discovered this just a week or so ago.


    FINAL IMPORTANT NOTE: After loading the plane for additional sessions, the joystick setup utility often doesn't "read" right away, leading to runaway views again. If that happens, press your shift+# key to bring up the utility, but don't manipulate it. When the utility is on your screen, simply try panning with your hat switch. This should cause the utility to start reading your inputs, and everything should go back to normal.


    I will follow-up with additional details later, but this should keep the crowd busy for a while.


    CLOSING REMARKS:
    Very few people in the FS community 1) are aware of this, and 2) know how to fly this. That's what makes learning this high-quality bit of freeware so rewarding. I will be offering an online, real-time help session with this aircraft in late May via Teamspeak and an FS multiplayer session (shared-cockpit not supported, but you can follow along) with further details on that announcement to come in the next few weeks.
    Side note: I am also offering a lesson on the Tu-154 on May 3rd, which I've announced here:
    http://nzff.org/forum/index.php?showtopic=22140

    EDIT:
    This video helped me, so it'll likely help you. It's all in Russian, but you can watch in HD in full screen, and it goes through the start-up. The INS is still a mystery to me, but everything else is there!
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mPZf1qeNvzI

    Let me know if you need help. There's a lot of little quirks that you simply need to exeperience before you learn how to mitigate them. You know how to reach me.

  7. #7
    Wow,thanks for the info.

    I hope i can start to learn to fly supersonic (in an airliner, of course).

  8. #8
    First Milestone achieved

    Now the Wobbling and tipping dissapear. I could start the BCY (APU) and the powerful NK-144 engines and other systems with the checklist.

    Now I will need work hard with the joy configuration. This utility still dont recognize the buttons of my joystick.

    I will read your explain about how to align the PNP-72 and PKP-72 carefully

    P.S. The INS as I can collect from the web is a systen called NPK-144 and is a basic FMS where the inputs are SVS, DISS, RSBN and VOR using dead reckoning navigation. I cant confirm if the system has an INS. It's a technology very very interesting (and obsolete of couse ). It's interesting because although its an evolution from NVU-B3 from Tu-154B2/M, is more advanced and sophisticated. The user interface is completety different, it looks simmilar to the most modern Pizhma-1 from Il-86.

  9. #9
    Ce_zeta and others observing....

    Here's a pictorial representation of what to press for the initial setup. It's a window that pops-up with Shift+7. That'll get the primary batteries on, and your navigation systems partially aligned.




    For full alignment, what you are about to see is available as a 2d pop-up by clicking on a certain portion of the 2d main panel, or is available in the VC (as shown), near the center.



    After getting everything else running (engines, other systems, etc) click the silver switch you see pictured there into position A3P. The yellow light will light up. I haven't bothered to do the translation yet.
    Then, set that black knob pictured to mode "MK1" (though MK2 or MK3 seems to be the same readout). The number above that (in this case 265) should always match your compass readout if you press "Shift-Z" and look at your mag heading. Compare the numbered readout (again, in this case 265) with what your HSI is showing. It is likely off by anywhere between 5 and 20 degrees. In this specific case, it was off by roughly 23 degrees, which is actually the most I've seen it off by, unfortunately. So, to correct for this and match your HSI heading with the numbered readout, rotate the circular knob with the "-" and "+" icons. You'll see the HSI card rotate, and you simply stop when the headings align. You may need to provide further correction in flight when you compare the HSI with the numbered readout due to compass drift.

    This likely isn't really realistic, but it's the best way I know how at this point in time. The real key to this likely lies in navigating the flight computer, but that's still beyond me at this point, and this solution works right now.


    Finally, here's a diagram of the autopilot functions on the yoke that someone else made and I am re-uploading here for the record. If you know the Tu-154, most of this should seem familiar, just not in the same organization format.



    Thanks.

  10. #10
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    Learning Curve

    These Russian airplanes have been around for a few years. And even today we are trying to figure out the PANEL in order to be able to fly them. Then there is the Russian words with no one able (or willing) to label the panel with English titles. And even then, the 'system' used is not for a MODERN panel, but for the panel used 'way back when'. Which is unacceptable due to the learning curve, and the meager rewards if you DO learn the 'in-n-outs'. To me it is a waste of time/effort just to satisfy some 'modeler' of (Russian) PANELS (as the model itself is Thomas Ruth's model on all counts). Homey don't play that game.

    By using another panel, which has digital gauges and works (99.9%) perfect in FSX (mostly having COSMETIC issues-nothing serious) I am able to fly it at FL 350, at at least Mach 1.3, yet fly 240 kts for ATC on approach. I can hand fly it, hand land it, or shoot an ILS and grease the landing in any/all types of weather. I had it flying at Mach 3.5, but this thing is not meant to fly THAT fast. I just started flying the Tu-144D this week after reading 'ce_zeta' complaint of it 'hopping, etc'. Man, was I shocked and amazed. Who in heck could ever fly this thing the way it's set up, even with another panel, is beyound me. I had to re-do the aircraft cfg, and the air file in order to not stall (take off or landing). I downloaded the Tu-144D '77115' and it had the Auto Pilot disabled in aircraft.cfg. Cheesh. And you need to 'LEARN' what?
    Chuck B
    Napamule
    PS: And here is a pic of your panel, as the one posted was too dim to read. Another thing you need to 'work on' and 'learn'? I guess.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails A3P pic.jpg  
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  11. #11
    Hold on, I am observing this topic develop with great interest.
    I have been a fan of the Tu154B for many years and I take pleasure in
    its Russian character.
    Isn't that the whole point, to learn how to operate a Russian aircraft, not how to change
    it to suit an American idea of how it should be?
    I hope that soon I will have time to apply the excellent and informed advice in this topic
    to my newly downloaded Tu 144.

    Nick.

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by napamule View Post
    PS: And here is a pic of your panel, as the one posted was too dim to read. Another thing you need to 'work on' and 'learn'? I guess.
    Woah there Tonto, what's with the aggression.
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  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by napamule View Post
    These Russian airplanes have been around for a few years. And even today we are trying to figure out the PANEL in order to be able to fly them. Then there is the Russian words with no one able (or willing) to label the panel with English titles.
    Just learn Cyrillic, it takes five minutes. Add another ten minutes or so for mission critical Russian words specific to the plane you're trying to fly.

    Quote Originally Posted by napamule View Post
    And even then, the 'system' used is not for a MODERN panel, but for the panel used 'way back when'. Which is unacceptable due to the learning curve, and the meager rewards if you DO learn the 'in-n-outs'.
    Why not then just accept that systems depth is not your cup of tea, and give credit where it's due for the complexity of the programming involved? I personally find it *very* rewarding to have some proficiency on the systems of a pre-Byzantine Soviet heap of s***, but I do understand those who are more content with a CTRL+E affair.

    Quote Originally Posted by napamule View Post
    To me it is a waste of time/effort just to satisfy some 'modeler' of (Russian) PANELS (as the model itself is Thomas Ruth's model on all counts). Homey don't play that game.
    I think you have this the wrong way around, you're not putting in any effort to "satisfy" the modeler, the modeler has put in all this effort to satsify *you*, for free.

  14. #14
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    Bottom Line

    My name is not Tonto. That is a derogatory ethnic slur. You have no right to call me that. For any reason. So, calm down.

    My point is that there are enough 'barriers' to being able to fly this 'Russian' airplane DUE TO THE PANEL 'PROBLEMS' already. And now the tutorial will be rife with MORE of the same? There is a 'standard' for taking a screenie and there is a (easily attained) standard when it comes to the quality of those pics. That's all I am saying.

    That is POSITIVE. Not aggressive. The advice would be for anyone, not at/to anyone specific. If you profess to be an 'Instructor', or expert, then you should have your ducks lined up before you step 'into the deep'. And this is in reference to the fact that NO ONE is 'working' on the REAL problems/limitations, which you will find in the aircraft.cfg and air file. Not just the panel. I am just trying to help.

    THERE is where the improvement are needed. Not on just learning to flip some 'foreign' type switches on some 'foreign' type panel. The switches are the same on Russian and American panels. Only the Language is different. I don't need to learn Russian so I can fly this ac. And if I DID learn to read Russian, when I go to switch on the AP, will it work? Or change radio frequencies. Will they work? Look again.
    Chuck B
    Napamule
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  15. #15
    I for one do not mind the systems depth. I used to use this one in FS9 just fine and I rarely fly "soft" systems models anymore. My biggest issue with this model and the TU-154 is the controller setup which I have had issues with. That's a killer for me. I enjoy the older Russian hardware that doesn't use this kind of external control setup but hey, I grasp their logic in doing what they wanted this thing to do. If they ever develop a simplified controller version or patch, I'd be willing to get this model and the TU-154 and use them regularly.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by An-225 View Post
    Just learn Cyrillic, it takes five minutes. Add another ten minutes or so for mission critical Russian words specific to the plane you're trying to fly.
    ...
    I don't understand Russian but I learned the cyrillic letters and even that helps. I can assure that Russian is much nearer English than for example my own language Finnish. It is as far from English (and Russian) as let's say Chinese though we use same letters as all western countries here (besides we have some our own like , , ). Fortunatelly we are a tiny nation so you don't have to learn our language. Most Finns (under 50 of age) speak three languages English, Swedish (which is our official second language teached for everyone in schools as practically English too) at least on some level of skills and of course Finnish - we have to - in order to manage in this nowadays global world.

    Pekka

  17. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by PHo17 View Post
    I don't understand Russian but I learned the cyrillic letters and even that helps. I can assure that Russian is much nearer English than for example my own language Finnish. It is as far from English (and Russian) as let's say Chinese though we use same letters as all western countries here (besides we have some our own like , , ). Fortunatelly we are a tiny nation so you don't have to learn our language. Most Finns (under 50 of age) speak three languages English, Swedish (which is our official second language teached for everyone in schools as practically English too) at least on some level of skills and of course Finnish - we have to - in order to manage in this nowadays global world.
    Yes, even just learning Cyrillic helps! You don't necessarily need a working knowledge of Russian. Especially if you can at least pronounce phonetically each step when it comes to flow-management in the cockpit. And some words are fundamentally similar to their English equivalent, e.g. БАТТЕРИЯ, batteriya, battery...

    I'm not sure what language your MiG-21s were marked in, but I would be up for the challenge of learning the MiG-21 cockpit in Finnish. For me, that's part of what keeps this hobby from stagnating. The constant acquisition of new knowledge and learning of new skillsets.

  18. #18
    Ok, I was hoping this wouldn't happen, but it's not surprising that it did based on my past experiences advocating Russian aircraft here. At least this time I haven't received rude PMs yet...

    As I'm extensively traveling this week, I'm writing now on a mobile, so bear with me in terms of formatting and any unusual autocorrect errors.

    First and foremost, this aircraft is a complex systems simulation of a 1970s Soviet airliner. The audience intended for it appreciates complex addons. If you are unwilling or incapable of learning a complex addon, this is not for you. This addon is not broken or problem prone in any way, and does not require mods to the aircraft config file, air file, or other hacks. As someone who uses it just the way it is, I can testify to that. A problem with comprehension is not indicative of a problem with the product.

    Yes, there is a learning curve, which is steepened by not knowing Russian, but again, I do not know the language, and I can operate this and the Tu-154 just fine, following some reading and LEARNING.

    Russian gauge logic does differ from "Western" designs significantly enough to warrant custom gauge logic for such things as the autopilot, just as one example.

    I have noticed that quite a few of Napamule's posts emphasize hacking a well crafted addon to bits because some users are incapable or unwilling to engage in learning. Disparaging an addon maker, as well as someone just trying to help others, is unacceptable, especially as you are not in the target audience for this addon.

    If you don't understand how an addon works and are incapable or unwilling to do so, that's your problem.

    I now have to catch a real flight on a lovely 737, but I'd like to keep providing proper assistance to those in this thread that care to learn. I do NOT profess to be an expert, simply a somewhat knowledgeable enthusiast. I may expand on this post when I have more time later.

    For those interested in learning, thanks for the interest and continued questions, as well as the appreciation for this high quality addon.

  19. #19
    Sean,
    Even though I'm not the individual who started this thread, I've been lurking in the background...gleaning helpful bits of information here & there. I've learned a bit from your posts about this particular Russian monster. Thanks very much for the effort you've shown to help out your fellow enthusiasts.

    As others have noted: for me personally the biggest obstacle with the PT planes & Tu-144 isn't deciphering the Cyrillic panels, but coming to terms with the rather user-unfriendly joystick utility tool.

    Regardless, since the Tu-144 is a freeware plane, there's no harm in someone deleting the plane if it doesn't suit their personal tastes. Problem solved!

    Thanks again.
    -Mark

  20. #20
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    Choice

    Nowhere did I read that you CAN fly the Tu-144D without using the 'Russian' panel. Or that you CAN fly the Tu-144D without using the 'proprietary' controller setup utility. Nowhere. Why? Is it a 'pride' thing. My way or the highway? I appreciate that the xml gauges control everything if you use the Russian panel and the controller utility (a deal killer for me too). Can't we just get along? Can't we have a version that uses a 'friendly' panel and regular controller setup?

    I can learn the Russian panel and do the controller utility. But for ONE AIRPLANE? Not worth it. Especially since I used my own 'friendly' panel and just a twist grip joystick (no pedals) and FDE tweaks as required and fly it very well, thank you. Which is what FS is all about. Not conforming to somebody's idea of what constitues a 'fun' package, of an (ab-normal) panel and (a buggy) utility.

    BUT, you HAVE to 'hack' (?) the aircraft cfg and air file or it won't fly. That is the way Flight Simulator X works. They are not going to change the Flight Simulator just to accomodate the Tu-144D, now are they? Talk about non conformists. Cheesh. Will it work in P3D? X-Plane? Why? The panel and the utility? (Dah).
    Chuck B
    Napamule
    I will make a video showing off the performance of the TU-144D in FSX using ANY panel, no controller 'Utility', and my FDEs. GET REAL!
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  21. #21
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    This is a flightsim site not a high school debating society. Please play nice and napamule, please lose the temper tantrums, they don't become a gentleman of your age. This thread is being closely watched and will be closed if necessary.
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    HD:2Tb Samsung 850 evo SSD

    To err is human; to forgive is divine

  22. #22
    Guys, just let me know if you have further questions. I'm done debating the merits of this addon. Thanks

  23. #23
    Sean, or anyone who HAS flown this addon,

    I'm having a devil of a time starting the engines. I can get the APU running, the bleed air configured, everything, but when I press the start button, the engine spools up and the number TWO needle jumps and then the number ONE needle (on the FE Panel) starts to creep up. the #2 needle hits 100, and the #1 creeps up to about 20-23% and hangs until the starter disengages. apparently I'm missing something, there's fuel, and everything else is good to go. What am I doing wrong?

    PS. I reconfigured the Aircraft.CFG by removing the 3,4,5,6 stations, as for some crazy reason, I could not get the weight to go away and the a/c was doing backflips on the tarmac. But after deleting the stations, which are supposed to be empty anyway, it sits just fine. However, now she loads with no fuel. Even though I'm able to load it in when the sim starts, does that make a difference?
    EDIT: She now loads with fuel, so thats not the problem

  24. #24
    Looks like this thread is back on target. Reading the dialog about the Tu-144 in this thread is interesting and hopefully helpful to those who download her.
    Regards, Tom Stovall, KRDD


  25. #25
    SH427,

    Can you post a screen of your engineer's panel please?

    I suspect the following;
    1. Engine stop levers not pushed forward. Look in the far lower left corner of the engineers panel for the white and green levers.
    2. Fuel flow control switches protected under covered panel near upper right(ish) of panel not flipped.

    I may be able to narrow it down further with a picture.

    When on the engine start sub-panel, does the green light turn on before hitting the starter, or does it stay red?

    I won't be able to attend to this tomorrow exempt possibly in the very late evening my time, just FYI.

    Also, are you loading the aircraft from the main fsx free flight menu, or are you switching to it from something else during your flight session? Should be loading fresh from the fsx menu right after you start up fsx before going into any actual flight scenarios.

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