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  1. #51
    This just arrived

    Attachment 17172

    Late birthday present from the Boss (she's a good girl really)

    It's a complete update of William Green's classic, to be published in 3 volumes, with great new photos, colour 3-views, cutaways, etc etc. Not, however, cheap.

    Here's the website
    http://www.aerospacemasterbooks.com/

  2. #52
    Very good. I know there has been some grumbling in the past from "Luftwaffe Experts" over some of the misinformation.

    Would be nice to have the updated volumes.

  3. #53
    Two slightly early birthday presents: Rob JM Mulder's book about the E.L.T.A. (Eerste Luchtvaart Tentoonstelling Amsterdam (First Aviation Exhibition Amsterdam) 1919) which scored five roundels in the April 2010 issue of Aeroplane, and the Fokker D.XXI issue of the 'Dutch profiles' series.



    Attachment 18070 Attachment 18071
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  4. #54
    Senior Administrator PRB's Avatar
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    Pappy Gunn, by Nathaniel Gunn

    http://www.amazon.com/PAPPY-GUNN-Nathaniel-Gunn/dp/141843776X

    To those who have read history of the Pacific War, Paul (“Pappy”) Gunn is a legendary name. He is probably most famous for his idea to turn B-25s and A-20s from glass nosed and ineffective level bombers to “hard nosed” gun ships, bristling with forward firing .50 cal Brownings. I've never heard of a book specifically about him, so when I saw this one I jumped on it. The fact that it was written by his son somehow confirmed for me, before even reading it, that it would be good. But that was an assumption, and you know how those go...

    The problem with this book is that it's written in such a hokey style that it's almost difficult to take seriously. And Nathaniel Gunn says some pretty wacky stuff, attributed to “Pappy”. Things like he invented skip bombing because he suddenly remembered one day that “naval guns 'automatically cut off' when they're elevation angle is less than 18 degrees, so if you come in low they can only hit you with light machine guns. 18 degrees? What? He has Pappy explaining this to the USAAC crews over and over again. “Just stay below their 18 degree line of fire and they can't touch you!” The other inspiration for skip bombing was that he noticed, during dive bombing practice, that “if you were off by just a couple of feet, the bomb would skip across the water like a flat stone across a pond.” What??!!

    And then there is the matter of the Dutch B-25s in Australia that ended up with the 3RD Attack Group in the summer of 1942. There are several versions of this story out there ranging from “there was an official agreement between the US and the Dutch governments, and the planes were transferred to the USAAC”, to “The men of the 3RD Attack Group ripped 'em off.” According to this book, Pappy noticed them, hatched the plan to steal them, lead the mission to steal them, and when the Dutch commander protested, pointed his two .45s at him, called he and all his countrymen cowards, and threatened to shoot him right there on the spot if he tried to stop him. I like the stories about Pappy Gunn, but if this one is true, it doesn't make him look so good. However, I'm not sure I'm buying that version of the story in the first place, given other accounts I have read of this apparently controversial event.

    What I really like about the book is all the source material, in the form of letters between Gunn and various generals and such, and between various generals and North American tech reps, and between generals and other generals about Gunn. These source documents show what was being said at the time, and shortly after the war, about Gunn and his inventions, particularly the “gun ship” conversions. On the down side, many of these source documents are poorly reproduced and difficult to read. When I was only a quarter way through the book I didn't think I would make it to the end. But now, at two thirds through, I think it's worth reading to the end.
    - Paul

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  5. #55
    A book I can recommend to all of you if you haven't come across it before - an absolute classic of its kind...

    Attachment 22119

    Frater tries to replicate the old Imperial Airways route from London to Brisbane as closely as possible using scheduled flights - his BA ticket had 53 sectors on it !- and the results are fascinating, and often hilarious. Details of his trip are interlaced with reminiscences of crew and passengers from the '30's, flying HP42's and Atalantas.

    A great read.

    Haven't enjoyed a book so much for a long time

  6. #56
    Currently reading the book Lefty posted above. A nice one so far. (Thanks Mike!)

    Also, finally picked up a copy of Gann's Flying Circus from ebay for $6. Hardcover too. Required reading from the Flight 19 library.



    Snagged a overview:

    "Ernest K. Gann began his love affair with flight in 1953, barnstorming in various wood & fabric bi-planes. Later, as an airline pilot, he flew to many parts of the world in a wide variety of the aircraft, from lumbering trimotored Fords to the latest jets. He shared the world's skies with many of the gallant airemen he writes about here.

    Gann traces the development in American of the commercial use of airplanes through the early days of airmail, air cargo, and the first passenger airlines. He takes the reader aboard such planes as the United Air Lines Boeing 40-B-4 delivering newspapers to the ranger station in Oregon; the 'Flying Brooklyn Bridge,' the 1936 Condor for which pilots developed an almost maudlin affection; the 'Tin Goose,' Ford's incomparable trimotored 4A-T; the incredible DC-3, which has cruised every sky known to mankind, and many others...

    Internationally, there are stories of Aeropostales' flights across the Andes and in Saint-Exupery country; Sabena in the Congo; Imperial Airway's deluxe flights in Scipios when Britain ruled the skies; BOAC's Lockheed, known as 'Bashful Gertie,' which shuttled bravely from Scotland to Sweden for essential ball bearings during WWI; and other aeronautic history.

    Little known anecdotes about legendary fliers abound -Juan trippe & Glenn L. Martin; Charles Lindbergh; Prof. Hugo Junker; whose firm built4,832 'Iron Annies' in Germany; and Count von Zeppelin.

    The final chapter finds the author back in a DC-3 after 19 years, this time piloting the Savaii from San Francisco to Apia in Western Samoa, with a crew of three.

    A dossier of the planes, in the order of their appearance in the narrative, appears at the end of the volume, with vital statistics on span, power, passenger load, gross weight, range, cruising and landing speeds."

  7. #57
    Senior Administrator PRB's Avatar
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    The Flight of the Mew Gull, by Alex Henshaw.

    This book was a fantastic read. At first I must admit to being a little bored. Not sure why, perhaps because the early chapters dealt with Henshaw's start in flying, which is a familiar story the world over. Anyhow, it got better quickly, in expected and unexpected ways. I knew it would be an adventure story about the record breaking speed run from England to Cape Town, and in this the book does not disappoint. In fact it went way beyond my expectations of exciting reading, from the scouting run that Henshaw and his father made in his Vega Gull, covering the entire course, the year before, to the actual flight by Henshaw in the tiny single seat Mew Gull. The accounts of flying across Africa in the 1930s is just great stuff.

    Two unexpected aspects of this book really had me interested. One was the insight into the British style handicapped air racing circuit of the 1930s. Henshaw flew many of these races, in a couple of different planes during these years. EasyEd should be interested to find that Henshaw became bored and disillusioned with the whole air racing scene once he figured out that the real challenge, and the key to winning these races, was to hoodwink the handicappers, just enough to ensure that they placed you in a take off time slot that ensured you would win.

    The other unexpected and the most interesting aspect to this book was the peek inside the engineering of fast planes in the 1930s. Hensahw spends a lot of time talking about the choices of engines, modification of engines, propeller designed, and variable pitch prop technology. He also spends a bit of words on air racing technique, particularly the best way to get around pylons. Lots of pilots in these races were doing Immelman style turns at the pylons, mostly, evidently, because it looked cool from the ground, and was great fun for the pilot. But, it not the most efficient method if you wanted to maintain speed across the race course...

    So anyway, it's a good book. Read it!
    - Paul

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  8. #58
    I seem to remember air racing on television (the old, grey, grainy variety) back in the fifties - commentated by the immortal Raymond Baxter, naturally.....

  9. #59

    Christmas is coming...

    What's everyone planning on getting for Chrsitmas book prezzies?

    I've ordered Empire of the Clouds from Mississippi, Nile, Amazon or whatever it's called (nearly half price there). This book has been heavily reviewed in the UK and is about how the British lost their 1950s aviation edge to the USA. So there will be a lot about Comets, but apparently he also blames long liquid lunches at De Havilland (which I find rather unlikely, but will defer judgment till I've read it). The guy who wrote it, James Hamilton-Paterson, seems to know what he's talking about, not just a journalist with a pair of scissors & a pot of glue.

    Also joined Air Britain which is well worth it for all the benefits of membership, including excellent discounts on excellent books. (No doubt lefty has been a member for decades.) Getting Red Sea Caravan the Aden Airways Story, right up my street and should give plenty of inspiration for some Middle East adventures in fs9!

    Anyway, will post some reviews when I've read 'em. What are you lot going for or hoping that Santa will bring?
    RR

    De Vliegende Hollander
    ________________________________________

  10. #60
    Well I've ordered 'Empire of the Clouds' too - not much surprise there !

    But I am not a member of Air Britain - thought about it........

    Nice to hear from you again, Ralf - Sherwood under snow just now, eh ???

    Fife certainly is......

  11. #61
    Yes, we are deep in it. It's more like, er, Scotland than Sherwood! Luckily I don't have to drive far for a while, but even short distances are hazardous.

    I posted Alexander Frater a fan letter when Beyond the Blue Horizon came out and he sent a very kind reply. He was Chief Travel Correspondent of the Observer, but now retired and doesn't publish much any more unfortunately.

    You may have seen that Empire of the Clouds got 5 roundels (= *****) in the Jan '11 Aeroplane, good news for us! I recommend Air Britain: got the Aden Airways book for about £30 and it's more like £70 in places on the Interweb Thingy.
    RR

    De Vliegende Hollander
    ________________________________________

  12. #62
    Then you must have this one to put the icing on the cake......

  13. #63
    Nice - don't have it yet.

    Graham Coster's Corsairville is another good one with a lot about the Imperial flying boats. He also travelled around the world in the 1990s, going on every flying boat still operating (not many , but he did it!). Bet you've got that...
    RR

    De Vliegende Hollander
    ________________________________________

  14. #64
    Yup !

  15. #65
    Finally got around to a job I have promised to do for some time now. Bought a laser barcode scanner on the Bay, some software from Collectorz, and set about cataloguing my aviation books.

    For insurance purposes, or should the collection have to be disposed of (i.e. when Lefty is gazing at you all from his stool in the Great Lounge Bar in the Skies), this is invaluable. It also indicates how much I've spent over the last few years (not to be divulged to the Boss). Thankfully a good proportion should actually be appreciating in value, although the market ain't great just now for obvious reasons.

    Basically it worked very well, although the early stuff has to be manual input. ISBN numbers are a bit of a minefield, with seeming duplicates, multiple identities, etc etc but you get there in the end.

    Anyone else tried this ????

  16. #66
    How has your barcode scanner task come along Mike? Sounds interesting.

    Santa brought several books for Christmas. (A few I can't divulge just yet as they will yield some good mystery planes).

    The one I dove into right away is Dornier Do 335 Pfeil, The Luftwaffe's Fastest Piston-Engine Fighter by Smith and Creek. It claims to be the definitive source of the 335 and so far I would tend to agree. Dozens of photos I have not seen before.



    The 335 is one of my favorite aircraft designs so it makes sense to have a volume dedicated to it.

  17. #67
    Senior Administrator PRB's Avatar
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    An excellent read here. As the title suggests, a history of the flying boats. Good stuff. Jablonski also wrote a book on the B-17 which is also good.
    - Paul

    Win7 x64 | GIGABYTE X79-UP4 | Intel Core i7-3820 Quad-Core 3.60 GHz | 16GB DDR3/1600MHz Quad Channel Memory | NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660 Ti 2GB 16X PCIe 3.0

  18. #68
    Charter Member 2015 delta_lima's Avatar
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    Etendard tomes ...

    All the recent FSX Etendard activity has made me curious about the vol 1 and 2 of these books:

    <TABLE class=result border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%"><TBODY><TR><TD class=itemNumbr vAlign=top>1. </TD><TD class=image width=140>

    Stock Image
    <SCRIPT type=text/javascript> var images1 = [ 'http://isbn.abebooks.com/lbr/md/29/91/md2914017529.jpg', 'http://isbn.abebooks.com/mz/md/29/91/md2914017529.jpg', 'http://isbn.abebooks.com/bwk/md/29/91/md2914017529.jpg', 'http://isbn.abebooks.com/tite/md/29/91/md2914017529.jpg', 'http://isbn.abebooks.com/italian/md/29/91/md2914017529.jpg' ]; fetch(images1, document.getElementById('listing_1'), document.getElementById('imagetype_1'), 1, "searchResults", "http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/P/2914017529.01._SL130_SCLZZZZZZZ__.jpg", "Stock Image"); </SCRIPT></TD><TD class=result-details colSpan=2>la saga étendard t.1 (ISBN: 9782914017527)
    Gall, Jean-Marie
    Bookseller: Chapitre librairies (Lamnay, FR, France)
    Bookseller Rating:

    Quantity Available: > 20
    Book Description: LELA PRESSE, 2009. Book Condition: neuf. Bookseller Inventory # 9782914017527
    Bookseller & Payment Information | More Books from this Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question

    </TD><TD style="WIDTH: 195px !important" class=result-addToBasket> Price: US$ 82.49
    Convert Currency
    Shipping: US$ 21.75
    From France to Canada
    Destination, Rates & Speeds

    </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE><TABLE class=result border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%"><TBODY><TR><TD class=itemNumbr vAlign=top>2. </TD><TD class=image width=140>

    Stock Image
    <SCRIPT type=text/javascript> var images2 = [ 'http://isbn.abebooks.com/lbr/md/37/91/md2914017537.jpg', 'http://isbn.abebooks.com/mz/md/37/91/md2914017537.jpg', 'http://isbn.abebooks.com/bwk/md/37/91/md2914017537.jpg', 'http://isbn.abebooks.com/tite/md/37/91/md2914017537.jpg', 'http://isbn.abebooks.com/italian/md/37/91/md2914017537.jpg' ]; fetch(images2, document.getElementById('listing_2'), document.getElementById('imagetype_2'), 2, "searchResults", "http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/P/2914017537.01._SL130_SCLZZZZZZZ__.jpg", "Stock Image"); </SCRIPT></TD><TD class=result-details colSpan=2>la saga étendard t.2 (ISBN: 9782914017534)
    Gall, Jean-Marie
    Bookseller: Chapitre librairies (Lamnay, FR, France)
    Bookseller Rating:

    Quantity Available: > 20
    Book Description: LELA PRESSE, 2009. Book Condition: neuf. Bookseller Inventory # 9782914017534
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    </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>


    Does anyone have these? Is vol 2 an update to vol 1, or is each a standalone? at over $100 each to bring them into Canada, I'll have to start saving ... lots ...

    thanks,

  19. #69

    Av Books.

    A must have : Fate Is The Hunter, by Ernest K. Gann......

    sbp.........:salute:
    CAN YOU HEAR ME, NOW?

  20. #70
    Re the Etendard books, DeltaLima, those prices seem to be the going rate - they are almost 60 Euros on Amazon France, where I have bought a few other volumes.

    Pretty serious books, I reckon, over 300 pages each, so, I'm afraid.............

  21. #71
    Charter Member 2015 delta_lima's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lefty View Post
    Re the Etendard books, DeltaLima, those prices seem to be the going rate - they are almost 60 Euros on Amazon France, where I have bought a few other volumes.

    Pretty serious books, I reckon, over 300 pages each, so, I'm afraid.............
    thanks lefty,

    I was curious if vol 2 was an update of vol 1, or if each is a complete standalone book, covering the various phases of the plane's operational life over 2 full volumes.

    Sorry if I miscommunicated.

    Yes, I've trolled ebay - I'd be into them for $100 any way I slice it ...that's clear for sure! :0

  22. #72
    Try this site for a review of each book - scroll down....

    http://www.aerostories.org/~aerobiblio/rubrique1.html

  23. #73
    Charter Member 2015 delta_lima's Avatar
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    Thanks lefty - the reviews certainly gave the linguistic portion of my cerebral cortex a workout and a half - but it looks like they are indeed a true vol 1 and vol 2.

    Bread and water diet for a few months ... I'll have these in a few months' time!

    dl

  24. #74
    Google Translate does an adequate, if sometimes hilarious, job !

    My schoolboy French has been shown up by some of my tomes from la Belle France.........

    (Not as bad as the Czech ones though.)

  25. #75
    Not a book as such, but a link to the Flight Magazine archives where you can download pdf's of every copy from
    Attachment 30948 to Attachment 30947

    http://www.flightglobal.com/pdfarchive/index.html
    "Taking off is optional, landing is mandatory!"

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