Adjusting critical altitude at Jet engines
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Thread: Adjusting critical altitude at Jet engines

  1. #1

    Adjusting critical altitude at Jet engines

    At FS98 it was easy, go to 600 and estabilish the parameter. At FS2000 it change place and it's hidden. Any clue about it? I'm working at a turboprop airfile.

    Cheers

    Pepe

  2. #2
    Interesting question. I haven't worked with turboprops (yet) in FSX.

    Real turboprops don't exactly have a critical altitude such as a turbo/supercharged piston. essentially they are either flat rated or not flat rated. As the engine can move more mass of air at SL it can generally develope the most power there. However in the case of a flat rated engine the power output is purposely reduced to a given temperature/torque limit as more power (or temp) could be developed than the engine/gearbox/prop can handle at lower altitudes. At some altitude full throttle would remain within the desired limits. So that is a critical altitude of sorts.

    The question remains as to whether or not some automatic limiter system is installed or the pilot must adhere to the limits by manually adjusting and monitoring the engine parameters. This would probably the type of setup you are modeling?

    Sorry to not have been helpful in answering your question as I have not "fiddled" with these.

    Cheers: T.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by fliger747 View Post
    Interesting question. I haven't worked with turboprops (yet) in FSX.

    Real turboprops don't exactly have a critical altitude such as a turbo/supercharged piston. essentially they are either flat rated or not flat rated. As the engine can move more mass of air at SL it can generally develope the most power there. However in the case of a flat rated engine the power output is purposely reduced to a given temperature/torque limit as more power (or temp) could be developed than the engine/gearbox/prop can handle at lower altitudes. At some altitude full throttle would remain within the desired limits. So that is a critical altitude of sorts.

    The question remains as to whether or not some automatic limiter system is installed or the pilot must adhere to the limits by manually adjusting and monitoring the engine parameters. This would probably the type of setup you are modeling?

    Sorry to not have been helpful in answering your question as I have not "fiddled" with these.

    Cheers: T.
    I'm working with a mix power German fighter: one Argus conventional engine and two BMW 003. The nearer engine arrangement evolved three turboprop. I got a fantastic SL performance, nearer the origin al project, that decay at altitude. At 12,000 meter, its maximum operational ceiling, the plane is sluggish. I have a conventional three engined Argus plane that behaves better at all levels and simulates well the original plane but I want to get the more autentic arrangement.

    Cheers


    Pepe

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