United 328 Heavy - engine fire - returned safely to DIA
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Thread: United 328 Heavy - engine fire - returned safely to DIA

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  1. #1

    United 328 Heavy - engine fire - returned safely to DIA

    audio UAL328.mp3 - Google Drive

    video https://youtu.be/XnSjAdvKp8k

    professionalism in the cockpit and on the ground saved many lives today
    enter..the Sandman

    visit Heywood Planes - YouTube

  2. #2
    This is major news, so it belongs in NewsHawks for greater visibility!

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by heywooood View Post
    audio UAL328.mp3 - Google Drive

    video https://youtu.be/XnSjAdvKp8k

    professionalism in the cockpit and on the ground saved many lives today
    Also good design, it looks from the vid as if one or two fan blades detached, the rest of the fan is still there, the fan containment wrap is still there, the resultant vibrations caused the cowlings to separate. If you've not seen it before watch this

    https://youtu.be/l8jgGoTc1Fc

    Ttfn

    Pete

  4. #4
    Charter Member 2017 srgalahad's Avatar
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    Meanwhile, in the Netherlands, a 747...
    https://airwaysmag.com/airlines/long...ngine-failure/

    "To some the sky is the limit. To others it is home" anon.
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  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by srgalahad View Post
    Meanwhile, in the Netherlands, a 747...
    https://airwaysmag.com/airlines/long...ngine-failure/
    someone in the twitter account yesterday made a remark about which engine mfg was involved in the 777 United incident - RR, GE, or Pratt - saying he 'hoped it wasn't Pratt'
    the remark drew questions about empathy for the people riding on this flight. However - if it were the same engine mfg in BOTH instances that would be important to know..

    also - how durable is Boeing these days? 737Max, 777 Dreamliner, 747...how much is deregulation and infiltration of the FAA by US aeronautical industrial shills going to end up costing them (and US) - over proper regulatory compliance.
    When will these people learn that greed and malfeasance carries a MUCH higher price than just doing the right thing.
    enter..the Sandman

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  6. #6
    it was a Pratt engine that failed on the 777 - United has parked all in service (24)777's for inspection. The balance of their 54 total 777 fleet is still in storage (covid)
    This engine is specific to the 777 and has a set of hollow fan blades..I guess to save weight? or be more fuel efficient? both probably
    enter..the Sandman

    visit Heywood Planes - YouTube

  7. #7
    Sitting in recurrent sim when this happened and there's nothing like a real world engine failure to validate the many hours we spend training for it. Just doubtful the general public realizes how much annual training in the sim focuses on engine failures in all conditions, although it's hard to simulate "passengers that don't wear a simple mask", but that's another issue. Just watched blancolirio channel and VAS Aviation vids.
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  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by heywooood View Post
    it was a Pratt engine that failed on the 777 - United has parked all in service (24)777's for inspection. The balance of their 54 total 777 fleet is still in storage (covid)
    This engine is specific to the 777 and has a set of hollow fan blades..I guess to save weight? or be more fuel efficient? both probably
    Correct, it's weight saving in the main Rolls Royce do same on their big engines, also there is an aerodynamic reason, large fans can set up noise harmonic vibrations at certain rpm ranges that fatigue the fan blades, hollow blades are less susceptible.

    The chap in that video is very reasoned, he is correct, engine fire suppression is designed to work with cowlings present, as historically most engine fires happen in that area, and they will not suppress a fire in the engine core.

    Ttfn

    Pete
    Last edited by Motormouse; February 23rd, 2021 at 01:57.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Motormouse View Post
    Also good design, it looks from the vid as if one or two fan blades detached, the rest of the fan is still there, the fan containment wrap is still there, the resultant vibrations caused the cowlings to separate. If you've not seen it before watch this

    https://youtu.be/l8jgGoTc1Fc

    Ttfn

    Pete
    agreed - more than one person with knowledge has commented on the engine remaining attached to a wing that was not broken off by the catastrophic failure or subsequent shaking and severe buffeting..even more
    impressive is that the wing internals were not impaired. Pilot had flaps, ailerons, spoilers - all functional to a degree for the duration of this incident..
    Solid engineering on that airframe would have to be implied.
    enter..the Sandman

    visit Heywood Planes - YouTube

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