Blackburn Beverley Uploaded
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Thread: Blackburn Beverley Uploaded

  1. #1

    Blackburn Beverley Uploaded

    Just added to the library: two FSX/P3D Beverleys (130 MB):



    The Blackburn Beverley was a four-engined, medium-range high-capacity transport. Its first flight took place in June 1953 and a total of forty- seven aircraft were built. The Beverley had an outstanding ability for packing and dropping heavy loads of up to 22 tons and, aided by powerful propeller reversing and a sturdy fixed undercarriage, it was able to land and take off at very small and makeshift airstrips. Employed on a wide variety of military and humanitarian missions, for the ten years of its active service life it was the R.A.F.'s proverbial no-nonsense workhorse. To date, only one Beverley survives as a museum piece (whose fate hangs in the balance). The model comes with an ILS and GCA-capable VC, variable intensity cockpit lighting, and propeller reversing. Two textures are included, XB261 representing a fictional reincarnation of the third production aircraft, and XM109 as painted in the 'Middle East' camouflage scheme of the final batch. Models and textures by Manfred Jahn, flight dynamics by Wayne Tudor, and soundset by Ted Wolfgang.

  2. #2
    All those rivets flying in such close formation!
    Very impressive work gentleman.
    "Illegitimum non carborundum".

  3. #3
    Can't wait to try her out!

    Thank you so much for all the work you've put into this, it's very, very much appreciated!

    Mark

  4. #4
    Thank you Manfred and team. Been looking forward to this one.

  5. #5
    Whoow! she is looking impressive!
    thanks a lot for another fine aircraft

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by wombat666 View Post
    All those rivets flying in such close formation!
    Very impressive work gentleman.
    I (just) remember seeing one of these doing the reverse-up-the-runway trick. Four Bristol Centaurus radials, so it burned quite a bit of petrol along with the oil.

    Great stuff Manfred and team!
    Tom
    __________________________________________________ ___________________________________________
    Wisdom is the principal thing; therefore get wisdom: and with all thy getting get understanding. Proverbs 4:7



  7. #7
    So happy that you masters of freeware aircraft addons do these fantastic jobs on non-mainstream-aircraft!!!! The Beverly was often seen at RAF Gutersloh those days, what a fat bird....thank you for this great surprise!
    Best regards, Manfred.

  8. #8
    NICE!

    Don't have much time for simming today, but I did manage to take her up for a few laps and a look-see.

    Thanks so much to all of those who were / are involve in publishing this aircraft. Very much appreciated!

    Tommy
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  9. #9
    Charter Member 2017 srgalahad's Avatar
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    I have an affinity for large, sometimes-cumbersome, ponderous cargo aircraft so I've been looking forward to Beverly making her entrance. I'm not disappointed! She's loud, brash and a bit of a handful, but treated right she does an admirable job.

    I realize that times were a bit tough in the 1950's in Britain in general and the RAF in particular, but I have to wonder if they might have carried austerity a bit too far when I discovered that the crew were not given even a modicum of comfort in a cockpit without seats... I see a VC_seat.dds in the common folder but there appears to be nothing to wrap it around... hmmm. No problem, I'll just scarf a couple of chairs from the Officers' Mess.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 00BEV-1.jpg  

    "To some the sky is the limit. To others it is home" anon.
    “Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new.” -Albert Einstein


  10. #10
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    Absolutely magnificent

    Many thanks to
    Manfred & Team for this classic.

    I had a quick flight this morning and I'm impressed with the visuals and handling

    Pete.

  11. #11
    Manfred, Nigel and Team.. another superb gift for the sim community. Thank you for the outstanding attention to detail to this beast. The ambiance, the sounds, the handling all seem spot on what one would expect for an airplane of this nature. I really enjoy flying it..and will be spending a lot of time in it. Great job, gentlemen.... Much gratitude.....tp

  12. #12

  13. #13
    Thanks guys, very gratifying to see that this ugly duckling has so many historically interested followers.

    Ted, thanks for the video take and that great sound.

    Srgalahad, you must have accidentally clicked on one of the yokes, which makes them and the seats disappear (probably unnecessarily, come to think of it, force of habit). BUT once they are gone you get a small red rectangle at the lower end of the main panel that says 'YOKE', and it's clickable, and gets them back.

    Tom, I, too, saw her active in the flesh, and all the museum exhibits, of course. When I began developing for FSX I was torn between doing either the Beverley or the C-47 ... as it happened, the latter won out, but only temporarily.

    Manfred (t'other one), yes, she did scheduled services to RAF stations in Germany, Wildenrath and Brüggen, too. Of course, I watched them from the Berlin Gatow end.

    One RAF pilot once told me that Beverley pilots were much admired for the tough missions they had to fly.

    --Manfred

  14. #14
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    Thanks Manfred and all involved for the Beverley.

    As an airframe mech on RAF Transport Command in the 50's and 60's, I saw the aircraft many times when they visited RAF Colerne where I was based. I climbed inside, but never got to fly in one.

    Our squadron had the HP Hastings, in which I amassed many flying hours. Sadly, although there is a model by Jens available, it has been largely overlooked by the FS developers.

    Den.

  15. #15
    Very Cool plane indeed! Thank you Manfred & Team for another wonderful aircraft.

    Click image for larger version. 

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  16. #16
    Good God it's ugly. I mean the real plane, not the model.

    I love it. Every piston powered heavy has a place here.

    I guess there's no forgetting the gear in this one. Good thinking...

  17. #17
    Wonderful, absolutely remarkable. I cannot imagine the level of expertise, patience and skills you have to make a model so magnificiently.
    And kindness to share it for free to the community.

    More over, thank you to have let us know why the hell you spent X hours on a such numerous, famous and gracious beast!
    I was really wondering and was close to propose you a Farman or Amiot bomber of the 30's for next one... Just a joke of course

    Just hoping there will be more, thank you again


  18. #18
    Fantastic aircraft!! Huge thanks to Manfred and his team for this masterpiece.

    Brian

  19. #19
    A beautiful model of a...less than beautiful airplane! I recall watching a video once wherein the Beverley was described as looking like a "furniture van." A quite accurate assessment, I'd say. Talk about character!

    Thanks to MJ and team for another freeware beauty. I've bounced her around England quite a bit already, and she flies wonderfully. There's nothing like taking off from a small field at 135,000 pounds, flying a quick pattern (i.e. not having to reduce the aircraft's weight at all), and rumbling back into the same small airfield with room to spare. Loads of fun!
    America never stopped being great.

  20. #20
    SOH-CM-2020 BendyFlyer's Avatar
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    Excellent work Manfred and friends. Yet another classic lost in the mists of time maybe there would have been more had it ever gone into civilian hands but alas that was not to be eclipsed by the turbine era. Fidelity is excellent and the flight dynamics faultless. As far as I can see it all worked straight out of the box so to speak.



    Feathered outboard and assymetric circuits - handled beautifully. Well done and congratulations but thank you.

  21. #21
    Just a follow-up after some more flying. I departed Middle Wallop bound for Akrotiri with 5,000 pounds of freight and about 30 passengers with full tanks. All-up weight was about 132,000 pounds. Got off the 3,800 foot long Runway 17 with room to spare and easily cleared the trees south of the field. Climbed to 9,000 feet in about 10 minutes at 125 KIAS, using max continuous power ( about 50" and 2500 RPM). Settled into cruise using 38" and 2100 RPM burning about 470 gallons an hour.

    For more about why I simulated these conditions, read about the Sutton Wick crash (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sutton_Wick_air_crash).

    Long story short, the Beverley's pilot notes match all of that almost perfectly. With the cruise power setting I used, the book gives an indicated airspeed of approximately 135 knots. The FSX Beverley settled in at 137 knots indicated! My friends, I can't say enough about this model.

    Disclaimer: I did make a change to the aircraft.cfg. The model as published had a total of 3,600 gallons of fuel (four tanks with 900 gals each). As near as I can tell, the Beverley had four fuel tanks in each wing (numbered 1 through 4) totaling 3,375 gallons, for a grand total of 6,750 gallons. So I changed the Mains to be equivalent to Tanks 1 and 2 (combined 2,145 gallons capacity each) and the Auxes to be equivalent to Tanks 3 and 4 (combined 1,230 gallons capacity each). Thankfully, the fuel gauges work in percentages and not gallons, so a quick change and everything works fine.

    Hopefully with Manfred's and Wayne's blessing, here's what my [fuel] section looks like now...

    LeftMain=-2, -14.0, 0, 2145, 12
    LeftAux=-2, -31.0, 0, 1230, 12
    RightMain=-2, 14.0, 0, 2145, 12
    RightAux=-2, 31.0, 0, 1230, 12

    If anyone is wondering, the Centaurus used Boost instead of Manifold Pressure for power settings. There's a formula to convert between the two, but the quick and dirty is (Boost x 2) + 30. That's how I came up with 38" for cruise. (Pilot notes say cruise is normally Boost +4...so (Boost 4 x 2)+30 = 8+30 = 38.

    Manfred's modelling is exquisite as usual, and Wayne's flight model is as close to spot-on as I could imagine. Aces, guys!
    America never stopped being great.

  22. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by nagpaw View Post
    Just a follow-up after some more flying. I departed Middle Wallop bound for Akrotiri with 5,000 pounds of freight and about 30 passengers with full tanks. All-up weight was about 132,000 pounds. Got off the 3,800 foot long Runway 17 with room to spare and easily cleared the trees south of the field. Climbed to 9,000 feet in about 10 minutes at 125 KIAS, using max continuous power ( about 50" and 2500 RPM). Settled into cruise using 38" and 2100 RPM burning about 470 gallons an hour.

    For more about why I simulated these conditions, read about the Sutton Wick crash (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sutton_Wick_air_crash).

    Long story short, the Beverley's pilot notes match all of that almost perfectly. With the cruise power setting I used, the book gives an indicated airspeed of approximately 135 knots. The FSX Beverley settled in at 137 knots indicated! My friends, I can't say enough about this model.

    Disclaimer: I did make a change to the aircraft.cfg. The model as published had a total of 3,600 gallons of fuel (four tanks with 900 gals each). As near as I can tell, the Beverley had four fuel tanks in each wing (numbered 1 through 4) totaling 3,375 gallons, for a grand total of 6,750 gallons. So I changed the Mains to be equivalent to Tanks 1 and 2 (combined 2,145 gallons capacity each) and the Auxes to be equivalent to Tanks 3 and 4 (combined 1,230 gallons capacity each). Thankfully, the fuel gauges work in percentages and not gallons, so a quick change and everything works fine.

    Hopefully with Manfred's and Wayne's blessing, here's what my [fuel] section looks like now...

    LeftMain=-2, -14.0, 0, 2145, 12
    LeftAux=-2, -31.0, 0, 1230, 12
    RightMain=-2, 14.0, 0, 2145, 12
    RightAux=-2, 31.0, 0, 1230, 12

    If anyone is wondering, the Centaurus used Boost instead of Manifold Pressure for power settings. There's a formula to convert between the two, but the quick and dirty is (Boost x 2) + 30. That's how I came up with 38" for cruise. (Pilot notes say cruise is normally Boost +4...so (Boost 4 x 2)+30 = 8+30 = 38.

    Manfred's modelling is exquisite as usual, and Wayne's flight model is as close to spot-on as I could imagine. Aces, guys!
    Man, what a very well-informed comment, many thanks. Didn't know about the Boost/Map formula, if I had I would perhaps have done Boost gauges instead of MAPs, or at least listed the Boost data as a tooltip (that can still be done).

    Your tanks capacity tweak is also absolutely correct, just tried it and it works well giving her quite a bit more range. At the same time, with these tanks full plus the current default 28,000 lbs payload all-up weight goes to 152,000, which is more than the official 135,000 or the unofficial 143,000 limit. So before take off, some adjustment to weight or fuel should be made. Actually, even on 152,000 the model doesn't care much except for being a bit more than usually sluggish.

    Wayne unfortunately is no longer with us, but he would have loved your comments.

    --Manfred

  23. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by mjahn View Post
    Man, what a very well-informed comment, many thanks. Didn't know about the Boost/Map formula, if I had I would perhaps have done Boost gauges instead of MAPs, or at least listed the Boost data as a tooltip (that can still be done).

    Your tanks capacity tweak is also absolutely correct, just tried it and it works well giving her quite a bit more range. At the same time, with these tanks full plus the current default 28,000 lbs payload all-up weight goes to 152,000, which is more than the official 135,000 or the unofficial 143,000 limit. So before take off, some adjustment to weight or fuel should be made. Actually, even on 152,000 the model doesn't care much except for being a bit more than usually sluggish.

    Wayne unfortunately is no longer with us, but he would have loved your comments.

    --Manfred
    Sweet! I helped!

    If you're interested, the formula I have to convert from Boost to Hg" is (Boost x 2.036021)+29.92126. The question I have for someone else is whether that is only true with standard atmospheric pressure (29.92" Hg). Do with it what you will!

    And, yes, the Beverley can quite quickly become payload limited with the new fuel loading! But check this out. The commonly stated performance numbers for the Beverley give a range of 1,100 nautical miles with a 29,000 pound payload at 8,000 feet. So using your model, with an empty weight of 82,100 pounds and a maximum gross weight of 135,000, a 29,000 pound payload leaves us 23,900 pounds for fuel, which is 3,983 gallons. Using my flight from before for reference, 3,983 gallons at 470 gallons/hour gives an endurance of 8.47 hours, which at 150 knots true airspeed, gives a distance covered of 1,270-ish miles, which is awfully close to the published 1,100 miles, especially if you consider the accuracy of the published number. Another win!

    Thanks again for a wonderful model of an obscure but totally awesome aircraft! And my apologies. I was unaware of Wayne's passing. I've used his stuff for years, and don't know how I missed that fact
    America never stopped being great.

  24. #24

    Blackburn Beverley Uploaded

    Hi,

    Just wanted to say a big thank you to Manfred and all the team for this most unusual aircraft. It flies lovely and feels really heavy, just as I would expect a big beast like this to behave.

    I have a couple of questions though, first, why did you originally pick such a relatively unknown, rare aircraft to build a model for, it is very quirky, which I like in my aircraft hanger. Also how did the real thing steer on the ground, was it through differential braking and a free castoring nose wheel, or through a tiller wheel like modern jets and the B97? I only as so I can set up my FSUIPC profile properly.




    Thanks again for this massive amazing beast!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 2020-5-27_14-17-29-914.jpg   2020-5-27_14-15-26-408.jpg  
    Happy Flying.

    David Phillips

  25. #25
    Hello David, I found this which not only answers your question but is the most amusing read I have had in a while. https://www.pprune.org/archive/index.php/t-76608.html
    Regards,
    Nick

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