Medal of honor - with one hand
Contribute Now
Goal amount for this year: 10000 USD, Received: 10,500.00 USD (105%)
Welcome Back, Unregistered     Today's Date:       Current Time: 

Please Support the SOH "2020 Charter Membership Drive"




Accepted Payment Types

Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Medal of honor - with one hand

  1. #1
    Charter Member 2017 srgalahad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    CYYC or MMSD (GMT -7)
    Posts
    4,825

    Medal of honor - with one hand

    While researching something totally unrelated I ran across the story of John C Morgan (Sgt./ Lt. Col).

    OK, so the ranks are a tale in itself...

    "Born August 24, 1914, in Vernon, Texas,...He worked in the Fiji Islands as a foreman on a pineapple plantation until 1938, when he returned to enlist as an aviation cadet in the U.S. Army Air Corps. However, because of his poor education record, he was refused enlistment. Working at an oil-drilling site for Texaco, Morgan suffered a broken neck in an industrial accident, and as a result was later classified 4-F by the Selective Service System.

    In August, 1941, Morgan joined the Royal Canadian Air Force, and after completion of flight training in Saskatchewan, Ontario, and RAF Church Lawford, England, was posted as a Sergeant Pilot with RAF Bomber Command. On March 23, 1943, he was transferred to the U.S. Army Air Forces as a Flight Officer and assigned to the 92nd Bomb Group's 326th Bomb Squadron, RAF Alconbury, England.

    After the war, Morgan returned to work for Texaco in California selling aviation fuel. Called back to active duty when the Korean War broke out, he took a leave of absence from Texaco (1950–53) and applied for combat duty. The Air Force denied his request but allowed him to fly cargo planes in the United States for two years. He completed his final year on active duty in the office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Air Force. He retired from the Air Force, a lieutenant colonel."


    Why the title? Well, after transfer to the USAAF he flew 25 1/2 missions but one was particularly significant. Rather than read the wiki page, it's more fun to watch this short official (film) video:
    https://archive.org/details/gov.dod.dimoc.26506

    The Wikipedia article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_C._Morgan

    Also, a story from Larry Milbury's Canav Books blog that adds some 'colour' and background: https://canavbooks.wordpress.com/201...ruary-26-1942/

    I hope you enjoy this trip down the internet "rabbit hole" as much as I did

    "To some the sky is the limit. To others it is home" anon.
    “Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new.” -Albert Einstein


  2. #2
    Wow 2 hours fighting with the pilot and plane. Pretty lucky he made it.

  3. #3
    Wow! What an incredible story.
    My computer:Win XP 32 Home SP3, Q9650 @ 3.6 GHz, 4GB DDR2-800 RAM @ 800 MHz, EVGA Nvidia 560Ti-SOC-1GB

  4. #4
    SOH-CM-2019
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    St Simons Island GA
    Age
    66
    Posts
    2,261
    This is the incident referred to at the beginning of "12 O'Clock High" with Gregory Peck, made 1949, the one where the B-17 plows through the tents on the side of the runway, landing wheels-up. The fictional character that was awarded the MOH in the film was a young LT named "Jesse."

  5. #5
    Great story. I immediately had the same thought about "Twelve O'clock High" and had no idea that part of the movie had this account as its source. That movie has always been in my top five best.
    W7-64, 3GHz, 16GB Ram, GEForce 9400GT

  6. #6
    Great story. Thanks for sharing. Just amazing that he survivied the flight and completed the mission. The details of the other crew casualties are pretty harrowing, and I can't help but feel sorry for them all. This makes it an even more amazing feat for Lt. Col. Morgan, dealing with all of this and the mission itself first hand.
    "Try to stay in the middle of the air. Do not go near the edges of it. The edges of the air can be recognized by the appearance of ground, buildings, sea, trees and interstellar space. It is much more difficult to fly there".

Members who have read this thread: 86

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •