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Thread: Hunkered down, here in Pensacola

  1. #26
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    Stanp-ede

    I like in California and am 79 yrs old. If I go to Smar&Final store (No Food Stamps allowed) I can find water, TP, and eggs. So go to a store that doesn't accept Food Stamps and you will probably find what you need. Time for Marshall Law and Ration Stamps (like during WWII). Only way.

    And the flu has killed 75 Million since it first came around (1900's) and nobody says anything about that! When it warms up, in a month or two, the virus will disappear. It don't like heat, or warm moisture, so hang on. Things will be back to normal soon. And if the hand sanitizer is not 90% Alchohol then it's useless. Soap is 5 times more effective.

    I bought 10 cans of dog food, just in case I can't get meat. Hey, it's better for you than spam, or other canned meat!
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  2. #27
    Your wife gets care with the VA as well? Pete
    I'm single, but her doctors would/might go for phone appointments. Radical times call for radical solutions.

  3. #28
    Washing the hands for 20 seconds works. The soap breaks down the fatty outer coating of the virus, killing it. Takes a few seconds. Wash first thing when you get home or after getting the mail.

  4. #29

    Stay home !

    God save humanity first !

  5. #30
    Sheltering in Place

    It can be done, and with reasonably little discomfort.

    California has just declared a voluntary lock down. As many here know, I recently survived a long period of stay at home following two full knee replacements. In pragmatic terms, I have been more or less house bound for the last six months...only going out for physical therapy twice a week and strolls in the meadows. I basically spent the last few months in my small home office...during the winter. It sounds boring, but in all truth the opposite proved to be true.

    I applied my time to to improving my dev skills, working in 3D Studio, Photoshop, Quixel and the myriad other programs associated with building airplanes and scenery. When the mesh got me crazy, I caught up on reading and doing my usual digging and research.

    What I can share here is this. While it is a bit tedious, locking down at home is not as horrific as it sounds. I'm a type A work horse, always need to do something personality. Even with the restrictions of mobility associated with integrating my "magic legs", I found that time passed very quickly...and...I got a whole lot smarter in the boot. I've learned a ton more about mesh, code, programming and the rest associated with the creation of simulation aircraft and scenery.

    If I might offer a small solution to boredom...take some time to explore your FSX or P3D SDK. Start with a small project and Milton's primer on airplane building, download the free starter software available to everyone and you may discover that building airplanes or scenery is a fine way to occupy long hours if confined/restricted to your home. The satisfaction is enormous, and you will find that it is actually more fun to fly when you have built your home airport and favorite mount.

    Another suggestion, converting existing aircraft to P3Dv4.5 PBR. Fantastic experience and extremely rewarding.

    It's just a thought, but I will be here along with many others who are more than willing to share tips, tricks and advice. Perhaps a thread on the subject will be in order.

    Thoughts??


    A couple of conversions I did a while back...

    PBR converted Boeing B-50...with modeling enhancements on the tarmac at my version of KRNO Reno Tahoe International.


    PBR converted C-97


    PBR converted Boeing B-50 California Central Valley Photoreal
    Last edited by gman5250; March 20th, 2020 at 03:32.
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  6. #31
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    We are in a small RV co-op community in a small town in the middle of the desert. We are hunkered down and at this time are not allowing traveling rv’s to stay.
    we are a senior community and we are mostly self isolating ourselves. Our neighbor bought 10 24 packs of toilet paper so if the **** hits the fan, we can wipe it off.
    Hope everyone is safe and this madness comes to an end real quick.

  7. #32

  8. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by eckifly View Post
    I looked through the various links at this site, but did not see anything related to this situation. Can you provide a specific link? NC

  9. #34

  10. #35

    Covid-19-geddon

    Its a good idea to act if you look at the numbers!

    Psalms 23:1

  11. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by napamule View Post
    I like in California and am 79 yrs old. If I go to Smar&Final store (No Food Stamps allowed) I can find water, TP, and eggs. So go to a store that doesn't accept Food Stamps and you will probably find what you need. Time for Marshall Law and Ration Stamps (like during WWII). Only way.

    And the flu has killed 75 Million since it first came around (1900's) and nobody says anything about that! When it warms up, in a month or two, the virus will disappear. It don't like heat, or warm moisture, so hang on. Things will be back to normal soon. And if the hand sanitizer is not 90% Alchohol then it's useless. Soap is 5 times more effective.

    I bought 10 cans of dog food, just in case I can't get meat. Hey,.or other canned meat!
    Chuck B
    Napamule
    It's probably better for you than TP

  12. #37
    As of 22/03/2020 the COVID-19 deaths in Australia stand at 7 Nation wide.

    At both State and National levels the number of confirmed infections remains quite low, NSW (our most populous state has just reached 537 infections, while I think (haven't been checking) the total infections for the Nation are around 2000+/-.

    There is (surprisingly) solid co-operative action between the Federal Governments and the States, and I'm really happy I live in Nation that is surrounded by a vast expanse of ocean(s), relatively sparsely populated, with a population (mostly) prepared to co-operate with the recommendations from the CMO and well used to helping one another out in difficult times.

    With COVID-19 following on the recent unprecedented fire season and the extended drought, in the main, the old tradition of looking out for one's 'mates' remains alive and strong.
    South Australia has a closed border policy in place and I expect that to become the norm.
    NSW have mandated a maximum of 500 people in open spaces and have already closed Bondi Beach, aided by the Surf Lifesaving Organisation, empowered with policing all beaches in the State.
    Victoria are likely to shut down the Sate Schools in the next few days, while the 'Unessential Travel Mandate' is most important, although it will impact so many small business operations who were counting on the brief Easter holiday season bringing tourists into the hard hit resort towns which had no annual holiday season income due to the fires.
    In comparison with Europe in general, America, Asia and now the African and Sub Saharan nations we are well behind the infection curve but not complacent.
    One small blessing for me are the 12 fractured ribs my wife is dealing with, as she can't go off with her MSF crew to some hard hit 'Foreign' destination........not charitable of me but we've been there often enough!

    One very important issue has been raised in Oz, a return to domestic manufacturing and far less reliance on cheaper imports is one of a few positives to come out of COVID-19.
    "Illegitimum non carborundum".

  13. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by wombat666 View Post
    One very important issue has been raised in Oz, a return to domestic manufacturing and far less reliance on cheaper imports is one of a few positives to come out of COVID-19.
    The same thing is happening here in Canada. Automotive parts manufacturers are to receive government funds to retool and produce things we need. They are starting with medical supplies, masks and respirators, first. This is a good thing for us as the manufacturers have been closing recently due to cheaper products coming from China and Mexico.

    The hardest hit might come to China. Their plants have been shut down for a long time now and with their clients on lockdown, there is nobody to sell to.

    Sometimes, out of the dark cloud, emerges something that will change our future.
    Matt

  14. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by aeronca1
    Sometimes, out of the dark cloud, emerges something that will change our future.
    It's what's probably emerging beyond this that leaves me more uncertain than the spread of the virus.

    The past twenty years has seen a dramatic rise in cost of living (housing primarily) coupled with historically low interest rates, leaving lower and middle class populations & governments in North America & Western Europe with a debt load that can simply be described as grotesquely over-extended.

    (The subprime mortgage crisis 2007-2010 in the 'States was a small scale dress rehearsal for what may be coming next....)

    For a couple of decades here in BC, analysts have repeatedly cited that the average middle class family was existing one or two pay checks away from debt payment default. Their warnings described how things were so delicately balanced that it wouldn't take much to shove the greater working population off the edge, triggering a much larger economic domino effect.



    Well.......here we go.



    Regarding China, they're much better set-up than most in the West can imagine. At this stage, the Chinese industrial economy can operate strictly within the borders of the country and still service a population that's become affluent enough to create growth.

    While the exploitation of the international economy was critical in the creation of China's staggering economic recipe, they're currently at a point where we may be little more than icing on the cake. (Mind you, that layer of icing might be almost as thick as the cake!)

    With that in mind, you may next witness a very large buy-up of distressed international business interests by Chinese money once this C-19 business has all run it's course, by far eclipsing the vast Chinese based acquisitions of global corporate assets already up to present.

    Everybody likes icing.

    The medical media tells us that Covid-19 will have marginal effect on kids, and most adults up to middle age can expect survivable flu-like symptoms if they're in good health.

    Seniors and people of any age with "challenged" immune systems can expect deadly consequences that can be overwhelming if encountering this virus.

    Now, translate that little ditty into economic language:

    China's economy is a young adult in a government control military-style athletic program, sucking back steroids all day long. It's simply loaded for bear at this stage.

    Find me another economy, anywhere around the world, in that kind of shape?

    All I can see are wheelchairs and walking aids, and maybe a few hopefuls still using training wheels to stay balanced.



    And as a real-time update, here in Vancouver, BC, regular gasoline is hitting a buck-a-liter in the evenings (unseen in decades), city bus rides are free, but you come and go from the back door and leave the driver alone, and Costco is refusing to refund returns on mass-hoarded toilet paper.


  15. #40
    Quote Originally Posted by magoo View Post
    And as a real-time update, here in Vancouver, BC, regular gasoline is hitting a buck-a-liter in the evenings (unseen in decades), city bus rides are free, but you come and go from the back door and leave the driver alone, and Costco is refusing to refund returns on mass-hoarded toilet paper.

    Good for Costco! I hope the hoarders enjoy eating the toilet paper!
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  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by napamule View Post
    in a month or two, the virus will disappear. It don't like heat, or warm moisture, so hang on.
    Napamule
    Well, it's still Fall here, temps are still around 85-95 at our place with up to 50% humidity (it's normally around 5-10%), and the virus is increasing exponentially, so.........
    We live 90km NE of Perth on 10 acres - can see 4 houses from our place, which is 4 too many, but, what the hell - they keep to themselves, I'd be quite happy to stay at home, but keeping some income coming in is as important, so it's in to town 3-4 days a week to the office. Working from home is OK if the internet plays ball - looks like we'll be doing that soon anyway, but still need to check in to the office - the nature of the work sometimes. It's a big office, with only 7 of us and, if I come in by not using any public transport (trains) I can travel home to office and back, without interacting with any other people.....The missus and I are both over 70 and both still work. She's been told she'll be working from home on Thursday - if not before. Good. Social distancing is the only thing that will give the medics time to get on top of it, or we'll go down Italy's path. To all those who say the Flu kills lots of people - yes it does, but it spreads it out, culling off the weak and infirm, but doesn't overwhelm the ICUs. There are fit 30 and 40 year olds dying from this thing at the moment - basically, shutting down is buying time for the medics.
    Quote Originally Posted by Wombat666
    One very important issue has been raised in Oz, a return to domestic manufacturing and far less reliance on cheaper imports is one of a few positives to come out of COVID-19.
    It's absolutely insane to all, except the big multi nationals, to destroy the local manufacturing base of a country. Australia, like the US, has been totally hollowed out over the last few decades - it's not just the main industry, it's all the feeder manufacturers and all the skills they have that are eventually lost.

  17. #42
    Quote Originally Posted by magoo View Post
    ;
    And as a real-time update, here in Vancouver, BC, regular gasoline is hitting a buck-a-liter in the evenings (unseen in decades), city bus rides are free, but you come and go from the back door and leave the driver alone, and Costco is refusing to refund returns on mass-hoarded toilet paper.
    Quite impressed by the stance taken along similar lines here: No returns or refunds on Date Rolls, Baked Beans, Rice, Flour, all manner of canned goods etc., covering retail outlets such as Coles, Woolworths, Ritchies, Aldi. Costco and all the other retailers who have had it with the hoarders. mmmmm

    Only $1:50 for petrol?
    It has long been the norm in Oz and the 'Pacific Peso' currently buys US$00:55+/- loose change.

    We have a few hundred litres of AvGas stored plus a similar amount of unleaded 91, in secure underground tanks I hasten to add.
    The AvGas is used for the performance cars and super-bikes, the 91 was an afterthought.
    Quite pleasant if one needs to drive somewhere essential, as the bulk of the Dickheads are finding it expensive and difficult to fill their stupid Crew Cab trucks and oversized SUV s........my current 911 is happy on 91 plus a mild additive, ecstatic if filled with AvGas and quite frugal if driven sensibly!

    Reality will strike home when 'Fuel Rationing' becomes the next mandated move.

    Should be a lot of Rangers, RAMs, Coloradeos and the like going cheap quite soon.

    "Illegitimum non carborundum".

  18. #43
    Quote Originally Posted by wombat666 View Post
    Only $1:50 for petrol?
    It has long been the norm in Oz and the 'Pacific Peso' currently buys US$00:55+/- loose change.
    >>>
    Should be a lot of Rangers, RAMs, Colorados and the like going cheap quite soon.
    I'm under the impression that the West Coast of Canada features the highest petrol prices in North America. About 40-45% is tax levied by municipal & provincial governments. Until late, it's been ranging about $1.48-$1.68 for 87 octane (regular) per litre. These days it's averaging about $1.07 - $1.08, and then on Wed/Thurs evening all the gas stations in Vancouver drop their prices just before the tanker trucks arrive from the refineries. That's were the price drops below a buck a litre between 7:00 & 11:00 pm. (Strange.)
    This is all in Metro-Vancouver. Once you move beyond that, the prices drop the further out you go.

    Still cheap gas by many standards around the planet. However, most Canucks will (resentfully) tell you how much cheaper the fuel is across the border in the USA, and in fact, there's lies the great tradition of those living near the border crossing south just to fill up their vehicles on a weekly basis.

    Discussing the future extinction of large gasoline powered cars, I wonder if the trend will be led first by the growing popularity of electric powered vehicles? While the marketing of those machines is still distinctly "soft-edged", I suspect in another decade they will be pushing "go-electric" much harder, while gasoline power begins to offer fewer options. (And of course, some governments are actually beginning to legislate such future limitations.)

    As the civilian automotive fuel market diminishes, pump gas availability will too follow that trend.

    Then, watch our home hydro bill begin to skyrocket. ( Invest in solar panel tech, now, while it's early!!)

    So, wombat666, if you have underground fuel storage, you must be in the rurals? I wonder about shelf life. I'm not an engineer, but I understand that automotive petrol and Avgas feature a cocktail of modifying element that tend to evaporate or breakdown quickly. Do you get through the stuff quickly enough to avoid the problem, or is it simply not an issue?

  19. #44
    My neighbors all stay in contact with each other, and we all own firearms. Today, I inventoried my ammunition. Crime in Pensacola (as in many cities) is expected to increase; leastwise in the short term. I checked with my neighbors, making sure they had enough ammunition as well. Hopefully this situation will get better soon, but for now, I (we) are being extra vigilant. NC

  20. #45
    Quote Originally Posted by magoo View Post
    Discussing the future extinction of large gasoline powered cars, I wonder if the trend will be led first by the growing popularity of electric powered vehicles? While the marketing of those machines is still distinctly "soft-edged", I suspect in another decade they will be pushing "go-electric" much harder, while gasoline power begins to offer fewer options. (And of course, some governments are actually beginning to legislate such future limitations.) As the civilian automotive fuel market diminishes, pump gas availability will too follow that trend. Then, watch our home hydro bill begin to skyrocket. ( Invest in solar panel tech, now, while it's early!!) So, wombat666, if you have underground fuel storage, you must be in the rurals? I wonder about shelf life. I'm not an engineer, but I understand that automotive petrol and Avgas feature a cocktail of modifying element that tend to evaporate or breakdown quickly. Do you get through the stuff quickly enough to avoid the problem, or is it simply not an issue?
    We live right at the Southern tip of Australia (almost!) overlooking the Southern Ocean on 9+60 Hectares, a former Dairy Farm now adapted as our home and our 'Big Boys Toys' operation.

    Fuel does get used regularly enough to not have any worry about it going off, and there were a couple of existing storage tanks already here when we moved in.
    I guess our nearest neighbor is a few Ks from us, and our area is more or less 'Rural', despite the fact that the Mornington Peninsula is a very popular tourist destination, nothing that bothers us as it is a K or so from the passing road to our house.
    Interesting you mention 'power', early last year we bought into a Community scheme for our own Solar Turbine (as in the Flinders Shire area) which came on line in December.
    We do have solar and a decent battery farm on site, so we don't pay the normal energy suppliers, our only expenses are a minimal quarterly maintenance payment for the turbine.
    Nothing to do with the current situation but I've been looking at Tesla's for some time, more as a daily driver but one that is a quick as well.
    I'm going to grow old(er) disgracefully!

    PS: Ammunition! We don't have any need of that sort of thing. This is not 'The Walking Dead'.......
    "Illegitimum non carborundum".

  21. #46
    We aren't concerned about "zombies", but there ARE real-life thugs that DO go through neighborhoods. There has been a increase in break-ins while homeowners are there, recently. We don't live out in the safety of the countryside. This is suburbia. NC

  22. #47

    Icon27 Reply...

    Magoo,

    Gas here about twenty miles south-southeast of Boston, MA is $1.77 per gallon at the moment; I heard in Kentucky, Tennessee and a few other states it's dipped to $0.99 or lower. For gas to be below $2.00 per gallon here in Taxachusetts is pretty remarkable.
    "Rami"

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  23. #48

    Icon28 Reply...

    Quote Originally Posted by Navy Chief View Post
    We aren't concerned about "zombies", but there ARE real-life thugs that DO go through neighborhoods. There has been a increase in break-ins while homeowners are there, recently. We don't live out in the safety of the countryside. This is suburbia. NC
    Navy Chief,

    A good friend of mine, GearyMcS, is a former Master Sergeant and lives in Panama City, we spoke last night on Skype. If they make it to Panama City, he's ready for them. Good luck and stay safe!
    "Rami"

    "Me? I'm just a Sea of Tranquility in an Ocean of Storms, babe."

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  24. #49
    OK...so some random thoughts and comments.

    Zombies: The have been around for a while. They are the ones who can't extract themselves from their Smart Phones.

    TP: You can't survive on it and my shower/w hand-held are one step away...in a pinch. Worst case...the yard is full of pine cones.

    Gas Prices: I just went across the street to the local store/fuel station. Gas was $4.57 USD for one gallon, but a coffee refill was still a buck. The upside...the bike gets 50 MPG, providing I don't grab too much throttle. The Silverado has been re-tasked to firewood and fuel storage.

    China Economy: They may appear strong, but they are inextricably woven into the Gordian Knot of Derivatives and negative bond yields, and they hold a ton of U.S. Debt in the form of long term bonds. Deutsche is the plunger in the powder keg, but JPM and quite a few others share the potential to set off the chain reaction.

    Download the IMF white paper.
    https://www.imf.org/en/Publications/...Insurers-45223



    I have long forecast that the Bond Bubble would break, beginning with China. I didn't know specifically what the pin would be to pop the bubble...but the current Black Swan event certainly has momentum.

    Compare the exponential growth of the pathogen against the exponential growth of the Repo bailout numbers. You can get those from the New York Fed website and build your own spreadsheet. The bailouts and the bug charts are carbon copies of each other. The original overnight interest spike that triggered the Repo crisis began last September...about the time that the bug was either accidentally, or intentionally introduced into the wild. The Repo money ran on a long flat line until the "virus" began to break out to the exponential. Now the Repo requires trillions per day, just to keep the banks liquidity stable. On a good day pre-Covid19, a nudge of one basis point would trigger chaos in the markets. Shutting down a global economic engine completely, for months, sets off an irreversible chain of "calls" on short contracts and derivative hedges. These are algorithm driven and nearly impossible to intervene...most likely the entire process is now block chain.

    The massive banks are in a panic to dump their short contracts on Gold and Silver. Just go to any legitimate dealer and look at the bid and ask, then go try to buy a coin. The contracts are hammering the shorts on digital metal, but premiums on real coins are rising while inventory's on physical have been completely depleted.

    All of this points to a very dangerous situation where governments will bail in infinite trillions to stop the hemorrhaging, but in reality the entire system is at risk...most likely beginning with Deutsche Bank, who were already auguring in for months prior to the bug.

    I have a personal strategy which I base on my understanding of economics, politics and human nature. I have followed it for nearly twenty years.
    I live 300 miles north of Los Angeles...intentionally. That is more than one tank of gas for just about everybody except line haulers. My home is one of the last structures on the eastern fringe of Kalifornia, from my kitchen window east there are thee states of desert and low mountain ranges. At my back are the Sierra Nevada Mountains which go straight up to 13,000 ft directly out my back door. No one, and I mean no one is going to cross the labyrinth of glacier canyons that separate me from Western Kalifornia without some serious climbing gear and a guide. From the south the desert is virtually impassable for anyone wishing to walk from LA to my house to steal potatoes. Same to the north but its Reno, which is 150 miles drive/walk. The roads both directions are either two lane or four lane...very controllable with multiple choke points...if necessary. And...Los Angeles only water travels down the same Owens Valley, leaving them very vulnerable to pissed off ranchers..if you get my meaning. It's not like it hasn't happened before...the Mulholland/California Water Wars. Just sayin'.

    I own my home, I'm not tied to the State with property taxes, technically the mobile is a vehicle. The structure is covered with corrugated metal and the walls are insulated with rigid foam, which is lined both sides with foil. Tin foil hat...maybe, but corrugated metal is a dandy Faraday Cage none the less. Call me a nutter, but I find it prudent to anticipate all variables.
    Locally we have a fully capable geo-thermal plant that can produce infinite energy from the lava lake below our butts. We have fish hatcheries that can be converted to food production, and we have many lakes within waking distance. The meadows are fertile cattle grazing soil that produce fields of edible flowers, and the streams are full of watercress and other edibles. This is cattle country, so food on the hoof is available for barter if necessary...and this is deer country.

    Calculating all of the available data, I am prepared to ride out worst case scenarios. The parallel trajectory of the pathogen and the potential for economic brain freeze are at this time breaking out to the exponential. I see no reversal on the horizon, so I'll create a strategy based on best available data, which is horrifically comprised at best. I'm allowing for the probability, and likelihood that data have been intentionally suppressed "to avoid panic". However, the charts don't lie, and the charts are going vertical. That's all I need to know until trends show signs of changing trajectory, but that is doubtful in light of existing supply chain shock.

    Recognizing that the post 2008 bailout (23 trillion all told) bond/derivatives bubbles have been systematically re-hypotheticated out into the quadrillions, I doubt that any form of theoretical economics will begin to touch a collapse once the weight passes the event horizon...and that is dangerously close. The trillions the Fed and Plunge Protection algorithm riggers threw at the markets resulted in precisely zero effectiveness, well not exactly zero seeing as how those billions were/are plunged into stock buy backs benefiting corporate officers and creating illusions of a 30,000 point market.
    Bottom line, there is no amount of counterfeit FIAT money that can put this monster back in its box.

    IMHO, the lunatics have screwed the pooch big time, and BTW...the bug came out of the University of North Carolina and was sold to the Chinese by a...err...former administration. That's proven data. The rest appears to be a temper tantrum of galactic proportions, thus validating my thesis that Eisenhower was right, and the lunatics took over the asylum.

    I've done the best I can, I've tried my best to help my friends prepare, now hopefully I can help my friends get through this as I implement what I have learned over the last two decades. If it all blows by, I'm none the worse for wear. If it doesn't I'm as prepared as I can be to ride out a storm.

    Thanks for being my friends. We don't necessarily need to agree but we can certainly share our combined knowledge to navigate what is clearly evolving into a life altering social paradigm shift.

    Ancillary tidbit;
    Go the Boston Fed website and search "Road to Roota" for some fascinating insights into what is currently taking place.
    For those inclined towards forensics...the insights are profound. Begin by asking why Nobel Laureates are writing comic books.
    https://www.bostonfed.org/publicatio...-to-roota.aspx
    Last edited by gman5250; March 24th, 2020 at 12:48.
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  25. #50
    Quote Originally Posted by wombat666 View Post
    Nothing to do with the current situation but I've been looking at Tesla's for some time, more as a daily driver but one that is a quick as well.
    I'm going to grow old(er) disgracefully!
    LOL...I love it. I'll bet you've seen the Youtube videos of street-racing Tesla's whooping....welll.....anything? (!!) I'd love to buy an insurance write-off Tesla and stuff the bits into a full sized American pickup truck, but they get snapped-up instantly by car trade insiders. Maybe in a few years when there's more of them on the road.


    Quote Originally Posted by Rami
    Gas here about twenty miles south-southeast of Boston, MA is $1.77 per gallon at the moment;
    YEEPERS! In Canuckspeak that works out forty six point seven cents (US) per litre. The funny thing right now, is that just about every vehicle you can see parked over here has it's tank filled, and if the owner has any jerry cans.....those too. As well.....very few folks are driving anywhere at all, so as the price at the pumps dips further down......almost nobody turns up!

    What would you call that, product saturation?

    Curious times.

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