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S
October 1st, 2008, 14:13
*requires the First Class Simulation WWI Fighters Package*

Major Francesco Baracca 1888 - 1918

http://mastersmithy.com/flightsimflicks/repaints/FrancescoBaracca02.jpg

Francesco Baracca was born in Lugo di Romagna on May 8, 1888. He joined the army in 1907 as a cavalryman but became interested in aviation and learned to fly in 1912. During the first year of the Great War he served as an instructur but flew his first combat mission somewhere in 1915. On April 7, 1916 he scored the first of his final total of 34 kills.

In 1917, Baracca became commander of the 91a Squadriglia, known as the "Squadron of the Aces", which included fellow aces Prince Fulco Ruffo di Calabria and Count Pier Ruggiero Piccio. Baracca saw little action in 1918, but he added more victories, for a total of 34, before failing to return from an attack mission on June 19.
On the evening of June 19, 1918, Baracca’s plane fell in flames on the Montello. The crew of an Austrian two-seater plane claimed they had shot him down, while the Italians believe that he was hit from a ground fire. The “end” of the best WWI Italian fighter pilot, who scored 34 official victories, is still unclear.

Ever wondered where Ferarri got the inspiration for their famous Prancing Horse logo from. The horse was originally the symbol of Francesco Baracca, who painted it on the side of his planes. Baracca had wanted the prancing horse on his planes because his squad, the "Battaglione Aviatori", was enrolled in a Cavalry regiment and also because he himself was reputed to be the best cavaliere of his team.


So for those interested, I've created a repaint for the FCS Nieuport 17 which was one of the planes flown by Baracca. I've uploaded the repaint to avsim and it's also available at my site. (http://mastersmithy.com/flightsimflicks/)
http://library.avsim.net/sendfile.php?Location=AVSIM&Proto=ftp&DLID=128387

Ferry_vO
October 1st, 2008, 14:23
Ever wondered where Ferarri got the inspiration for their famous Prancing Horse logo from. The horse was originally the symbol of Francesco Baracca, who painted it on the side of his planes. Baracca had wanted the prancing horse on his planes because his squad, the "Battaglione Aviatori", was enrolled in a Cavalry regiment and also because he himself was reputed to be the best cavaliere of his team.

IIRC He 'borrowed' the horse from a German aircraft he had shot down; apparently the pilot came from Stuttgart and he had the crest of his home town painted on his aircraft which has a prancing horse in it. The logo is still present these days on one of Ferrari's biggest competitors, Porsche!

http://www.autocult.com.au/img/gallery/997GT32.jpg

:)

Lionheart
October 1st, 2008, 15:06
Dang...

I didnt know that... Thanks for the heads up!



Bill

S
October 2nd, 2008, 09:45
You're welcome Bill! :D

Yup, all too right Ferry. God knows where the city of Stuttgart got it from. Even in today's armies and regiments all over the world you can see horses being used on cavalry standards. Ferarri didn't use the horse until many years later I think. It's cool to read the stories behind such well-known logos! :d

wombat666
October 2nd, 2008, 09:59
You're welcome Bill! :D

Yup, all too right Ferry. God knows where the city of Stuttgart got it from. Even in today's armies and regiments all over the world you can see horses being used on cavalry standards. Ferarri didn't use the horse until many years later I think. It's cool to read the stories behind such well-known logos! :d

Enzo Ferrari first used the 'Prancing Horse' insignia in 1929, at the time he launched 'Scuderia Ferrari' to run the 'Factory' Alfa Romeo squad.
Ferrari was a great admirer of Baracca, and the emblem was presented to him by the parents of the Italian ace, the yellow background being the official color of the town of Modena ...... so the story goes.
:kilroy:

Sixghost
October 2nd, 2008, 11:38
Also, according to newer researches, Baracca did shoot himself in the head as the engine caught fire, his body and his handgun were found a few meters from the plane wreckage after being shoot out on impact. The gun was missing a single bullet...

A true man in life and unfortunately, in death.

Another example of bravery can be found in the story of Ernesto Cabruna, a lesser known Italian WWI ace.

Wombat is right, the praching horse was donated to Enzo Ferrari by Baracca's parents.