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View Full Version : What's the best WaCom Graphics Tablet?



OleBoy
April 12th, 2009, 13:01
I'm looking into getting a graphics tablet for my work.

I've read the reviews for the Intuos4 (not many because it's new) It sounds like there are a lot of bugs with that model.

I've also read the reviews for the Wacom Intuos3 9x12 A4 Graphics Tablet Intuos 3 PTZ-930 (http://cgi.ebay.com/Wacom-Intuos3-9x12-A4-Graphics-Tablet-Intuos-3-PTZ-930_W0QQitemZ280332775790QQcmdZViewItemQQptZAU_Inp ut_Peripherals?hash=item280332775790&_trksid=p3286.m20.l1116), and find this to be the best available as of now. I personally don't know a thing about them aside from what I've read. They seem nice, and I think they'll benefit my repainting projects very much.


But from more a personal preference of users here,..
What's the best, most versatile, largest screen bang for the buck model???

I was considering the WaCom brand.

1 - What do you use now?
2- What one would you like to have to replace it?


Feedback needed please.

Kiwikat
April 12th, 2009, 14:19
I'm using a 4 x 6 intuos3. Couldn't ask for better quality. It's the perfect size for me and my setup.

OleBoy
April 12th, 2009, 14:32
Thanks for the reply Kiwikat.

I've got a rather large desk that I bought from the forestry service some years back and have ample room. Hence my looking at a larger one.

Would you mind sharing with me some of the true benefits of a tablet, as opposed to doing everything directly through the photoshop or paintshop programs?

Also, what's the longevity of these dang things?

Moparmike
April 12th, 2009, 14:33
Well, the Intuos line is the top of the line tablet (until you hit the touchscreen/tablet Cintiq models), but it's a pretty spendy unit too. Wacom products have treated me really well and they've got good support for their products too even the old stuff.

I've got a Wacom Graphire3 6"x8" (the same size as their current Graphire Wireless model, but mine is corded). I've used the smaller 3x5 Graphire and some of the earlier small Bamboo models and wasn't real pleased with the resolution or control with them when doing photo/paint or CAD work...I'd stick with 6"x8" for that myself.

The newer Bamboos have 512 levels of pressure sensitivity and 2540 lines per inch resolution which is a little better than the 512 & 2000lpi that my G3 tablet has...should be just fine for hobby use. The Intuos line has 2048 level pressure sensitiviy and 5000lpi resolution which is quite a bit better...but you're taking a BIG pricetag jump to get there too.

Also, if you go with the Intuos line you get another "fourth axis" of pen movement with the tilt axis...you can set the tilt of the pen to vary a tool (such as brush width or angle). But I've never needed that for the graphic work that I've done so I guess I don't miss not having that on my G3. Just the pressure axis has been adequate for what I do.

If I'd have to buy a new one for hobby use, I'd probably go with the 5.3"x8.5" Bamboo Fun Medium model.


If you do some Googling you can find some pretty good tablet tutorials on the net. Spend some time on the Wacom site too...they've got lots of tips and tuts there too.

Kiwikat
April 12th, 2009, 14:37
Thanks for the reply Kiwikat.

I've got a rather large desk that I bought from the forestry service some years back and have ample room. Hence my looking at a larger one.

Would you mind sharing with me some of the true benefits of a tablet, as opposed to doing everything directly through the photoshop or paintshop programs?

Also, what's the longevity of these dang things?


Well you still have to use photoshop or some other program to paint in. I've got PS CS3 Extended. Using a tablet feels a lot more natural than using a mouse for many of the tools.

If you like to draw or do camo on planes, it is a big help. If you do lots of vector drawings with the pen tool and general touch-up you might not get as much out of it. YMMV. Simply put it, if you use it, it is worth the money.

OleBoy
April 12th, 2009, 14:40
Thanks for the reply MoparMike.

This is what I need, response from the people that use them. I've heard that Intuos is a very good brand and have excellent support. I like the thought of having the higher resolutions for a finer detail. Fs2004 repaints is just the beginning for me and there's lots for me to absorb my degree of perfection I'm wanting. I'm sure as time goes by, I'll eventually be doing repaints for FSX also.

OleBoy
April 12th, 2009, 14:43
Well you still have to use photoshop or some other program to paint in. I've got PS CS3 Extended. Using a tablet feels a lot more natural than using a mouse for many of the tools.

If you like to draw or do camo on planes, it is a big help. If you do lots of vector drawings with the pen tool and general touch-up you might not get as much out of it. YMMV. Simply put it, if you use it, it is worth the money.

I guess there is a lot of vector graphics use in the aircraft repainting, though I've just begun to scratch the surface in that direction. There's a lot for me to learn in that aspect also. For me, I consider the tablet giving me the ability to refine what I want out of the looks I'm trying to achieve.

Am I thinking right?

Moparmike
April 12th, 2009, 14:44
Would you mind sharing with me some of the true benefits of a tablet, as opposed to doing everything directly through the photoshop or paintshop programs?

Also, what's the longevity of these dang things?

Basically, think of that pen/tablet as a cursor/tool controller (just like you use a joystick to control flightsim). You've got X & Y axis cursor movement in addition to right and left "mouse" buttons...plus you have a pressure sensitive axis that will allow you to vary (for example) your paintbrush/airbrush/whatever-tool opacity, pressure, size, etc on the fly. If you go with that Intuos, you can also control another variable of the tool on the fly by tilting the pen from horizontal to vertical. All this is done with just holding the pen instead of a mouse...much easier on the wrist and it's a fairly natural thing to pick up as it is very similar to sketching with a pencil instead of holding a mouse.

The hardest thing for me was getting used to sketching on the pad while watching the screen, but after a while it gets to be just as natural as runnin the mouse and watching the screen. Didn't take too long to acclimate though.

As for the longevity, My G3 is 4 years old or so and I haven't had any problems with it at all. Just replaced a few pen tips as they do wear down after a while.

OleBoy
April 12th, 2009, 14:52
MoparMike

The whole concept behind the tablets is intriguing. I've loved to draw for many years. I even ventured into doing airbrush work with the Binks airbrush. I see the tablets in this way (strange way of thinking I guess) I've drove many roads through the years all over the country sides. I see where taggers, gang member and thugs have left their marks everywhere while defacing others personal property. But I also look at in other ways. Some of these taggers are excellent artists by means of a spray can in different colors. Changing the angle not only increases the depth, sharpness and strength, but also shows the manner of control possible with a spray tip.

I see the tablet as a benefit in those means for me and my paints

Kiwikat
April 12th, 2009, 15:02
I guess there is a lot of vector graphics use in the aircraft repainting, though I've just begun to scratch the surface in that direction. There's a lot for me to learn in that aspect also. For me, I consider the tablet giving me the ability to refine what I want out of the looks I'm trying to achieve.

Am I thinking right?

I use the pen tool (with my mouse) for a LOT of stuff. As we get to higher and higher resolutions, vector graphics will become more common. I only use my tablet for certain things. It may help you refine some abilities but it probably won't affect some others at all.

Moparmike
April 12th, 2009, 15:12
I moved this down to the Toy Room (hardware forum) but will leave a redirect. Might be useful to some others that might not see it in the FS9 forum.

Like kiwi, I only use my tablet when I'm mucking about in PSP, Photoshop, and I also use it as a substitute for a digitizer tablet in AutoCAD. So it doesn't get daily use, but at least a couple times a week.

OleBoy
April 12th, 2009, 15:17
Sounds good. I was wondering if this topic was correct for there anyways. Sorry man

Moparmike
April 12th, 2009, 15:19
No problem...even if it's not in the right place to start with we'll still help ya out! :wavey:

wombat666
April 12th, 2009, 23:46
Wacom's Cintiq 21UX is the top of the line 'Down-Under'.
It's also horrendously expensive at A$3325.00 but at 1600x 1200 it's brilliant to work on!!!:faint:
Having decided I wanted one I applied as many metods of 'discounting' as I have at my disposal.
Right now there is a bit of a 'buyer's market' with these items, at least, if one pays in 'real' crispy notes, all of a sudden GST goes away and some haggling removes the RRP off the table, while the DOD 'discount' brings the real selling price into play.

My previous workhorse was an Intuos3 A4 12x12 'Oversize' Graphics Tablet, around A$750.00 at the time and a very good piece of kit, but one I've 'outgrown'.
Learning how to get the best out it is an ongoing saga, but worth the effort!

No idea how well these units work for skinning, my use has been confined to modelling prototypes and patterns for my 'car stuff', with a little CG 'Art' for light relief.
One thing for sure, quality is excellent and treated right they last (almost) forever!

:applause: